Wanderings in New South Wales, Batavia, Pedir Coast, Singapore, and China: Being the Journal of a Naturalist in Those Countries During 1832, 1833, and 1834, Volume 2

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Richard Bentley, 1834
 

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Página 282 - Welcome to their roar! Swift be their guidance, wheresoe'er it lead ! Though the strain'd mast should quiver as a reed. And the rent canvas fluttering strew the gale, Still must I on.; for I am as a weed, Flung from the rock, on Ocean's foam to sail Where'er the surge may sweep, the tempest's breath prevail.
Página 330 - The object of inquiry ... is chiefly whether a sick person will recover; for this purpose the nut being placed on the ground, a relation of the sick person determines that, if the nut, when again at rest, points to such a quarter, the east for example, that the sick man will recover; he then prays aloud to the patron god of the family that he will be pleased to direct the nut so that it may indicate the truth; the nut being next spun, the result is attended to with confidence, at least with a full...
Página 45 - It seemed impatient, hopping about without withdrawing its gaze from the mirror, uttering the usual cawing notes, but with evident surprise that the reflected figure, or, as he seemed to regard it, his opponent, imitated so closely all his actions and was as watchful as himself. There was, however, on his part no indication of combativeness by any elevation of the feathers, nor was any irritation displayed at not being able to approach nearer to the supposed new comer from his own native land. His...
Página 371 - We had the curiosity to take one of them by the point of the •wings and fling it over the rock; yet, though it had several hundred feet of a clear fall, it never recovered itself, but dropped down like a stone. On this account, when not engaged with their young, they usually rest upon the edge of the precipice, from which they can launch at once into the air...
Página 156 - I did so: and he occasionally would cast a furtive glance towards the place where I sat. I pretended to write; he, seeing me busily occupied, took the soap, and moved away with it in his paw. When he had walked half the length of the cabin, I spoke quietly, without frightening him. The instant he found I saw him, he walked back again, and deposited the soap nearly in the same place from whence he had taken it. There was certainly something more than instinct in that action: he evidently betrayed...
Página 41 - This elegant creature has a light, playful, and graceful manner, with an arch and impudent look ; dances about when a visitor approaches the cage, and seems delighted at being made an object of admiration : its notes are very peculiar, resembling the cawing of the raven, but its tones are by far more varied.* During four months of the year, from May to August, it moults. It washes itself regularly twice daily, and after having performed its ablutions, throws its delicate feathers up nearly over...
Página 407 - ... it, as the animal was sinking when the boat approached, and had it not been so damaged it would have escaped. I extracted the fish in a perfect state, which was firmly attached to each side of the upper cavity of the shell.
Página 48 - Having concluded, he jumps down to the lower perch in search of donations of living grasshoppers, seemingly in the most happy and good-humoured manner. The bird is not at all ravenous in its habits of feeding ; but it eats rice leisurely, almost grain by grain ; should any of the insects thrown into his cage fall on the floor he will not descend to them, appearing to be fearful that in so doing he should soil his delicate plumage ; he therefore seldom or never descends, except to perform his ablution...
Página 404 - I sent a party of men, under the direction of Mr. Gore, in search of refreshments for the sick : this party returned about noon, with a few palm cabbages, and a bunch or two of wild plantain ; the plantains were the smallest I had ever seen, and the pulp, though it was well tasted, was full of small stones. As I was walking this morning at a little distance from the ship, I saw, myself, one of the animals which had been so often described : it was of a light...
Página 262 - In most of the sharks, the mouth is furnished with very numerous teeth for the supply of such as may be lost. The white shark has more than two hundred, lying on each other in rows, almost like the leaves of an artichoke. Those only which form the front row have a perpendicular direction, and are completely uncovered. Those of the subsequent rows arc, on the contrary, smaller; have their points turned backwards, and are covered with a kind of gum.

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