History of the Discovery of the Valley of the Mississippi

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A. M. Hart, 1852 - 154 Seiten

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Seite 150 - That the limits and boundaries of this State be ascertained, it is declared that they are as hereafter mentioned ; that is to say : bounded on the east by the Pennsylvania line ; on the south by the Ohio River to the mouth of the Great Miami River; on the west by the line drawn due north from the mouth of the Great Miami aforesaid ; and on the north by an east and west line drawn through the southerly extreme of Lake Michigan, running east, after intersecting the due north line aforesaid from the...
Seite 151 - Miami aforesaid; and on the north by an east and west line drawn through the southerly extreme of Lake Michigan, running east, after intersecting the due north line aforesaid from the mouth of the Great Miami, until it shall intersect Lake Erie or the territorial line, and thence with the same, through Lake Erie, to the Pennsylvania line...
Seite 140 - ... bloody war ; but the habit of a wandering and idle life has prevented their enjoying the fruit of their labours, and profiting by the very price, to which these lands have risen in so short a time. They have emigrated to more remote parts of the country and formed new settlements. It will be the same with most of those, who inhabit the borders of the Ohio. The same inclination that led them there, will induce them to emigrate from it.
Seite 141 - ... is assured by a numerous population. The last comers instead of log-houses, with which the present inhabitants are contented, will build wooden ones, clear a greater quantity of the land, and be as industrious and persevering in the melioration of their new possessions as the former were indolent in every thing, being so fond of hunting. To the culture of Indian corn they will add that of other grain, hemp, and tobacco; rich pasturages will nourish innumerable flocks, and an advantageous sale...
Seite 149 - Miami river ; thence running up the Ohio, to the mouth of the Little Miami river; thence up the main stream of the Little Miami river, to the place where a due west line, to be continued from the western termination of the northern boundary line of the grant to Messrs. Sargent, Cutler...
Seite 144 - Their whole dress is very singular, and not very materially different from that of the Indians; being a hunting shirt, somewhat resembling a waggoner's frock, ornamented with a great many fringes, tied round the middle with a broad belt, much decorated also, in which is fastened a tomahawk, an instrument that serves every purpose of...
Seite 150 - That the inhabitants of the eastern division of the territory northwest of the river Ohio, be, and they are hereby authorized to form for themselves a constitution and state government, and to assume such name as they shall deem proper, and the said state, when formed, shall be admitted into the Union, upon the same footing with the original states, in all respects whatever.
Seite 139 - ... of courage. Prior to our arrival at Marietta, we met one of these settlers, an inhabitant of the environs of Wheeling, who accompanied us down the Ohio, and with whom we travelled for two days. Alone in a canoe from eighteen to twenty feet long, and from twelve to fifteen inches broad, he was going to survey the borders of the Missouri8* for a hundred and fifty miles beyond its embouchure.
Seite 79 - ... fifty able-bodied men there to make a settlement. He erected a mill and other buildings for the use of their productions, and the settlement was known as Byrd's Warehouse. In 1682, Colonel Byrd was a member of the governor's council, and he was much in public employment, until his death. When, after the revocation of the edict of Nantes, a large number of Huguenots, or French Protestants, came to America, three hundred of them were cared for, with parental solicitude, by Colonel Byrd, and they...
Seite 80 - REPAR. 1741. minded of the distinguished services which their descendants have rendered to our country, and to the cause of civil and religious liberty. Gabriel Manigault, of South Carolina, assisted this country, which had been the asylum of his parents, with a loan of $220,000 for carrying on its revolutionary struggle for liberty and independence. " This was done at an early period of the contest, when no man was certain, whether it would...

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