The Evolution of Useful Things: How Everyday Artifacts-From Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers-Came to be as They are.

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 1 de dez. de 2010 - 304 páginas

   How did the table fork acquire a fourth tine?  What advantage does the Phillips-head screw have over its single-grooved predecessor? Why does the paper clip look the way it does? What makes Scotch tape Scotch?

   In this delightful book Henry, Petroski takes a microscopic look at artifacts that most of us count on but rarely contemplate, including such icons of the everyday as pins, Post-its, and fast-food "clamshell" containers.  At the same time, he offers a convincing new theory of technological innovation as a response to the perceived failures of existing products—suggesting that irritation, and not necessity, is the mother of invention.

 

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LibraryThing Review

Comentário do usuário  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

Did you ever stop to think that the four-tined fork which brings food to your mouth and the two-tined fork you use to hold meat while carving it came from the same food necessity and that they are ... Ler resenha completa

LibraryThing Review

Comentário do usuário  - jen.e.moore - LibraryThing

Though a little bit dated, this is an interesting discussion of how design and invention work. Rather than "form follows function," Petroski argues, form follows *failure* - specifically the failure ... Ler resenha completa

Conteúdo

Preface
5
Form Follows Failure
22
From Pins to Paper Clips
51
Little Things Can Mean a
79
Stick Before Zip
92
Tools Make Tools
114
Patterns of Proliferation
130
Domestic Fashion and Industrial Design
154
The Power of Precedent
171
When Good Is Better Than Best
220
Always Room for Improvement
237
Notes
253
List of Illustrations
275
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Sobre o autor (2010)

Henry Petroski is the Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and a professor of history at Duke University. The author of more than a dozen previous books, he lives in Durham, North Carolina, and Arrowsic, Maine.

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