John Wiclif, Patriot & Reformer: Life and Writings

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T. Fisher Unwin, 1884 - 164 páginas
 

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Página 26 - ... all the day long. 13 As for me, I was like a deaf man, and heard not : and as one that is dumb, who doth not open his mouth. 14 I became even as a man that heareth not : and in whose mouth are no reproofs.
Página 49 - That first he wrought, and afterward he taught. Out of the gospel he the wordes caught, And this figure he added yet therto, That if gold ruste, what shuld iren do? For if a preest be foule, on whom we trust, No wonder is a lewed man to rust...
Página 49 - PERSOUN of a toun ; But riche he was of holy thought and werk. He was also a lerned man, a clerk, That Cristes gospel trewely wolde preche ; His parisshens devoutly wolde he teche.
Página 56 - But this Master John Wycliffe translated it out of Latin into English, and thus laid it more open to the laity and to women who could read, than it had formerly been to the most learned of the clergy, even to those of them who had the best understanding. And in this way the gospel pearl is cast abroad, and trodden under foot of swine...
Página 49 - Upon his fete, and in his hand a staf. This noble ensample to his shepe he yaf, That first he wrought, and afterward he taught.
Página 56 - Gospel pearl is cast abroad, and trodden under foot of swine, and that which was before precious to both clergy and laity is rendered, as it were, the common jest of both. The jewel of the Church is turned into the sport of the people, and what was hitherto the principal gift of the clergy and divines is made for ever common to the laity.
Página 49 - Of his offring, and eke of his substance. He coude in litel thing have suffisance. Wide was his parish, and houses fer asonder, But he ne left nought for no rain ne thonder, In sikenesse and in mischief to visite The ferrest in his parish, moche and lite, Upon his fete, and in his hand a staf.
Página 39 - ... to England at large. With an amazing industry he issued tract after tract in the tongue of the people itself. The dry, syllogistic Latin, the abstruse and involved argument which the great doctor had addressed to his academic hearers, were suddenly flung aside, and by a transition which marks the wonderful genius of the man the schoolman was transformed into the pamphleteer.
Página 50 - But in his teching discrete and benigne. To drawen folk to heven, with fairenesse, By good ensample, was his besinesse : But it were any persone obstinat, What so he were of highe, or low estat, Him wolde he snibben sharply for the nones.
Página 86 - ... may be best known to them. Forasmuch also as the doctrines of our faith are more clearly and exactly expressed in the Scriptures, than they may probably be by priests ; seeing, if I may so speak, that many Prelates are...

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