The American Angler's Guide: Containing the Opinions and Practice of the Best English and American Anglers, with the Modes Usually Adopted in All Descriptions of Fishing, Method of Making Artificial Flies, Etc, Partes 1-2

Capa
H. Long : J.J. Brown, 1849 - 224 páginas
 

O que estão dizendo - Escrever uma resenha

Não encontramos nenhuma resenha nos lugares comuns.

Outras edições - Visualizar todos

Termos e frases comuns

Passagens mais conhecidas

Página 11 - Whilst some men strive ill-gotten goods t' embrace; And others spend their time in base excess Of wine, or worse, in war, or wantonness. Let them that will, these pastimes still pursue, And on such pleasing fancies feed their fill; So I the fields and meadows green may view, And daily by fresh rivers walk at will, Among the daisies and the violets blue, Red hyacinth and yellow daffodil.
Página 215 - Fly fishing may be a very pleasant amusement ; but angling or float fishing, I can only compare to a stick and a string, with a worm at one end, and a, fool at the other.
Página 144 - And if myself have leave to see, I need not their light, having thee. Let others freeze with angling reeds, And cut their legs, with shells and weeds, Or treacherously poor fish beset, With strangling snare, or windowy net: Let coarse bold hands, from slimy nest The bedded fish in banks out-wrest, Or curious traitors, sleave-silk flies Bewitch poor fishes
Página 14 - Sir, there be many men that are by others taken to be serious and grave men, which we contemn and pity. Men that are taken to be grave, because nature hath made them of a sour complexion, money-getting men, men that spend all their time first in getting, and next in anxious care to keep it ; men that are condemned to be rich, and then always busy or discontented : for these poor, rich men, we Anglers pity them perfectly, and stand in no need to borrow their thoughts to think ourselves so happy.
Página 37 - And full well may you think, If you troll with a pink, One too weak will be apt to miscarry. Then basket neat made, By a master in's trade, In a belt at your shoulders must dangle; For none e'er was so vain, To wear this to disdain, Who a true brother was of the angle. Next pouch must not fail...
Página 89 - Soon in smart pain he feels the dire mistake, Lashes the wave, and beats the foamy lake, With sudden rage he now aloft appears, And in his eye convulsive anguish bears ; And now again, impatient of the wound, He rolls and...
Página 102 - Which o'er the stream a waving forest throw, When if an insect fall, (his certain guide) He gently takes him from the whirling tide, Examines well his form with curious eyes, His gaudy...
Página 10 - atte the leest, hath his holsom walke, and mery at his ease, a swete ayre of the swete sauoure of the meede floures, that makyth him hungry; he hereth the melodyous armony of fowles ; he seeth the yonge swannes, heerons, duckes, cotes, and many other fowles...
Página 14 - ... we contemn and pity. Men that are taken to be grave, because nature hath made them of a sour complexion; money-getting men, men that spend all their time, first in getting, and next, in anxious care to keep it; men that are condemned to be rich, and then always busy...
Página 10 - With eager bite of pike, or bleak, or dace ; And on the world and my Creator think : Whilst some men strive ill-gotten goods t' embrace; And others spend their time in base excess Of wine, or worse, in war, or wantonness.

Informações bibliográficas