The mill on the Floss, by George Eliot. Stereoptyped ed

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1867
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Página 404 - Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine.
Página 363 - Philip — you play the accompaniment," said Lucy, " and then I can go on with my work. You will like to play, shan't you?" she added, with a pretty inquiring look, anxious, as usual, lest she should have proposed what was not pleasant to another ; but with yearnings towards her unfinished embroidery. Philip had brightened at the proposition, for there is no feeling, perhaps, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music — that does not make a man sing or play the better...
Página 350 - But not the whole of our destiny. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, was speculative and irresolute, and we have a great tragedy in consequence. But if his father had lived to a good old age, and his uncle had died an early death, we can conceive Hamlet's having married Ophelia, and got through life with a reputation of sanity notwithstanding many soliloquies, and some moody sarcasms towards the fair daughter of Polonius, to say nothing of the frankest incivility to his fatherin-law.
Página 7 - Oh, dear! I wish they wouldn't fight at your school, Tom. Didn't it hurt you?" "Hurt me? no," said Tom, putting up the hooks again, taking out a large pocket-knife, and slowly opening the largest blade, which he looked at meditatively as he rubbed his finger along it. Then he added: " I gave Spouncer a black eye, I know — that's what he got by wanting to leather me; I wasn't going to go halves because anybody leathered me.
Página 6 - How stodgy they look, Tom! Is it marls (marbles) or cobnuts?" Maggie's heart sank a little, because Tom always said it was "no good" playing with her at those games — she played so badly.
Página 7 - I'll ask mother to give it you." " What for? " said Tom. " I don't want your money, you silly thing. I've got a great deal more money than you, because I'ma boy. I always have half-sovereigns and sovereigns for ' my Christmas boxes, because I shall be a man, and you only have five-shilling pieces, because you're only a girl.
Página 105 - I if you had had the advantage of being " the freshest modern " instead of the greatest ancient, would you not have mingled your praise of metaphorical speech, as a sign of high intelligence, with a lamentation that intelligence so rarely shows itself in speech without metaphor, — that we can so seldom declare what a thing is, except by saying it is something else...
Página 77 - said Maggie. " My father is Mr. Tulliver, but we mustn't let him know where I am, else he'll fetch me home again.
Página 465 - It is coming, Maggie!" Tom said, in a deep hoarse voice, loosing the oars, and clasping her. The next instant the boat was no longer seen upon the water — and the huge mass was hurrying on in hideous triumph.

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