Essays: First Series

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Phillips, Sampson, 1852 - 333 páginas

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Página 47 - It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion ; it is easy in solitude to live after our own ; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.
Página 50 - Speak what you think now in hard words, and tomorrow speak what tomorrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict everything you said today.
Página 61 - Life only avails, not the having lived. Power ceases in the instant of repose; it resides in the moment of transition from a past to a new state, in the shooting of the gulf, in the darting to an aim.
Página 40 - There is a time in every man's education when he arrives at the conviction that envy is ignorance ; that imitation is suicide; that he must take himself for better for worse as his portion ; that though the wide universe is full of good, no kernel of nourishing corn can come to him but through his toil bestowed on that plot of ground which is given to him to till. The power which resides in him is new in nature, and none but he knows what that is which he can do, nor does he know until he has tried.
Página 167 - Her pure and eloquent blood Spoke in her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought That one might almost say her body thought.
Página 310 - We are stung by the desire for new thought ; but when we receive a new thought it is only the old thought with a new face, and though we make it our own we instantly crave another ; we are not. really enriched. For the truth was in us before it was reflected to us from natural objects ; and the profound genius will cast the likeness of all creatures into every product of his wit. But if the constructive powers are rare and it is given to few men to be poets, yet every man is a receiver of this descending...
Página 53 - Caesar is born, and for ages after we have a Roman Empire. Christ is born, and millions of minds so grow and cleave to his genius that he is confounded with virtue and the possible of man. An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man; as Monachism, of the Hermit Antony; the Reformation, of Luther ; Quakerism, of Fox ; Methodism, of Wesley ; Abolition, of Clarkson. Scipio, Milton called "the height of Rome" ; and all history resolves itself very easily into the biography of a few stout and earnest...
Página 41 - Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string. Accept the place the divine providence has found for you, the society of your contemporaries, the connection of events. Great men have always done so, and confided themselves childlike to the genius of their age, betraying their perception that the absolutely trustworthy was seated at their heart, working through their hands, predominating in all their being.
Página 92 - Crime and punishment grow out of one stem. Punishment is a fruit that unsuspected ripens within the flower of the pleasure which concealed it. Cause and effect, means and ends, seed and fruit, cannot be severed; for the effect already blooms in the cause, the end preexists in the means, the fruit in the seed.
Página 44 - No law can be sacred to me but that of my nature. Good and bad are but names very readily transferable to that or this; the only right is •what is after my constitution, the only wrong what is against it.

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