Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Testibus supradictis, et multis Given under our hand, in the pre-Magna Canta aliis. Data per manum nostram in sence of the witnesses above named Kisions. - #: - fl 4rato quod vocatur Running mede and many others, in the Meadow \oyo-e

inter Windelesor et Staines, quinto called Runingmede, between Windecimo die Junii, anno regni nostri delsore and Staines, the 17th day of septimodocimo.; - June, in the 17th year of our Reign.

* Runningmede : in some copies, Runimede. t This is copied by Rapin, and is conformable to the exemplar in p. 9 of the Statutes of the Realm.

In page 229 of the Penny Magazine for the year IS33, there is a copy of the original seal of King John to Magna Charta; and a specimen of a facsimile of the writing of Magna Charta, beginning at the passage Nullus liber homo capietur vel imprisonetur, &c. In that account of Magna Charta, Runnymead is derived from 1. Runningmead; because it has been used as a race ground. But there is no proof of races having been held there in the time of King John. 2. Runemede; from Rune, a place of Council. It having been used, as the writer says, as a place of council or conference before this occasion. 3. My own opinion is (knowing the locality well, having been there repeatedly, and at Cooper's Hill,at the bottom of which, and between the Hill and the Thames,this meadow lies) it was called Running Mead, or meadow; from the small rivulets in it, in wet weather. It being a moist and marshy meadow, bordering the river Thames, about 21 miles from London. It would be dry enough as a place of meeting in the middle of June, when the Barons met there. Cooper's Hill, which overlooks this meadow, is the place celebrated in the verses of Sir John Denham; whose beautiful description of the Thames from thence is no less accurate than poetical:

“Tho' deep yet clear; though gentle yet not dull;
“Strong without rage, without o'erflowing sull.”

The present popular name of the place is Runnymead. The London engraved edition of the sac simile of Magna Charta (of which the Editor has a copy) is surrounded by the Courts of Arms, emblazoned in colours, of the Barons who formed the Committee appointed by that Instrument.

WOL. I.-13.

CONTENTS OF THE STATUTE OF 25 EDW. 1st.

RECITING AND CONFIRMING THE GREAT CHARTER OF 9th HENRY 3d,

A. D. 1297.

Chapt. or Sect. 1. A confirmation of liberties of the Church and of Freemen.

Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.

Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.

Sect,
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.
Sect.

Sect.
Sect.

Sect.
Sect.

Sect.
Sect.
Sect.

[ocr errors]

. The relief of the King's tenant at full age.
. Wardship of an heir within age; the heir of a Knight.

No waste shall be made by a guardian on ward's lands.

. Guardians shall maintain the inheritance of their wards.
. Heirs shall be married without disparagement.
. A widow shall have her marriage inheritance, and quarantine.

Not to be compelled to marry.

. How sureties shall be charged to the King.

The liberties of London, and other places, confirmed.
. None shall distrain for more service than is due.

[blocks in formation]

. Purveyance for a Castle.
. Doing of Castle Ward.
. Taking of horses, carts and wood. -
. How long the King shall hold the lands of felons.

. In what places Weirs shall be thrown down.
. In what cases praecipe in capite is not grantable.
. There shall be but one measure throughout the Realm; like-

wise one weight.

. Concerning Inquisition of life and member.
. Where there is tenure of the King in socage and tenure of

another by Knight's service. Of Petit Serjeantry.

. No wager of law to be demanded without a witness.
. No man shall be condemned without trial by his Peers, or by

the law of the Land. Right and Justice shall neither be denied, sold, or delayed. ' s

30. Merchant strangers shall be well used.

. Tenure of a barony coming to the King by escheate.
Lands shall not be aliened to the prejudice of the Lords ser-

vice.

[ocr errors][merged small]

Sect. 33. Patrons of Abbies shall have custody of them when vacant. CoNTENTs
Sect. 34. A woman shall have appeal of death for her husband only. Maas..."cano,
Sect. 35. When the County Court, the Sheriff's Torn, and the Court of
Leet shall be held. - 25 Edward L.
Sect. 36. No land shall be given in Mortmain. *...*~
Sect. 37. A subsidy granted to the King in consideration of this Charter,
and the Charter of the Forrest.
Schedule of Confirmation by King Edward 1st, in the 25th year of his

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

Ex Magno rotulo Statutorum in Turre Londini, in 40. 39. 38.

[blocks in formation]

Edward, by the Grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Guyan, to all to whom these present letters shall come, Greeting. We have seen the Great Charter of the Lord Henry, sometimes King of England, our father, of the Liberties of England, in these words:

HENRy, by the Grace of God, King of England, Lord of Ireland, Duke of Normandy and Guyan, and Earl of Anjou : To the Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, Priors, Earls, Barons, Sheriffs, Provosts, Officers, and to all Bailiffs, and other our faithful subjects which shall see this present Charter, greeting. Know ye, That we, unto the honour of Almighty God, and for the salvation of our soul, and the souls of our progenitors and successors, Kings of England, to the advancement of Holy Church, and the amendment of our Realm, of our meer free will, have given and granted to all Archbishops, Bishops, Abbotts, Priors, Earls, Barons, and to all freemen of this our Realm,these Liberties following, to be kept in our Kingdom of England forever.

I.

First, we have granted to God, and by this our present Charter, have

« ZurückWeiter »