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When the vanquished foe

Sues for peace and quiet,
To the shades * we'll go,
And in love enjoy it. +
O mount and

go,

&c.

O DEAR! MINNIE, WHAT SHALL I DO?

TUNE-O dear! mother, what shall I do ?

« Oh dear! minnie, what shall I do?
Oh dear / minnie, what shall I do?
Oh dear! minnie, what shall I do ?”.
“ Daft thing, doiled I thing, do as I do.”

If I be black, I canna be lo'ed;
If I be fair, I canna be gude;
If I be lordly, the lads will look by me ;
Oh dear ! minnie, what shall I do?

Oh dear! minnie, what shall I do?
Oh dear! minnie, what shall I do?
Oh dear! minnie, what shall I do ?”
“Daft thing, doiled thing, do as I do."

* Could the poet here mean the celebrated tavern called “ The Shades," near London Bridge? † From Johnson's Musical Museum, Part III. 1790.

Stupid, with imbecility.

This amusing old thing is printed in Johnson's Musical Museum, (Part III. 1791,) as the ancient verses for an air which is there given with à song beginning, “Oh dear Peggy, love's beguiling.”

The superstitious notions which the girl entertains regarding the fates attached to particular complexions, are by no means discountenanced by the old oral poetry and proverbs of Scotland. The following, for instance, is a rhyme which one sometimes hears quoted by the country people, as a law upon the subject :

Lang and lazy,

Little and loud,
Red and foolish,

Black and proud.

KILLIECRANKIE.

TUNE-The braes o' Killiecrankie.

Where hae ye been sae braw, lad ?

Where bae ye been sae brankie, 0 ?
Where hae

ye been sae braw, lad ?
Cam ye by Killiecrankie, 0 ?

An ye had been where I hae been,

Ye wadna been sae cantie, O;
An ye had seen what I hae seen

On the braes o' Killiecrankie, O.

I've faught at land, I've faught at sea ;

At hame I faught my auntie, 0;
But I met the deevil and Dundee,

On the braes o' Killiecrankie, O!

The bauld Pitcur fell in a fur,

And Claverse gat a clankie, 0;
Or I had fed an Athole gled,

On the braes o’ Killiecrankie, 0.*

DONALD COUPER.

TUNE-Donald Couper and his man.

Hey Donald, howe Donald,

Hey Donald Couper!
He's gane awa to seek a wife,

And he's come hame without her.

O Donald Couper and his man

Held to a Highland fair, man ;
And a' to seek a bonnie lass-

But fient a ane was there, man.

* From Johnson's Musical Museum, Part III. 1790 ; where it is marked with the letter Z, signifying that it was an old song, corrected and enlarged for that publication.

At length he got a carline grey,

And she's come hirplin hame, man ; And she's fawn ower the buffet stool,

And brak her rumple-bane, man.

*

LITTLE WAT YE WHA'S COMING !

TUNE-Little wat ye wha's coming!

LITTLE wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming ;
Jock and Tam and a' 's coming !

Duncan's coming, Donald's coming,
Colin's coming, Ronald's coming,
Dougal's coming, Lauchlan's coming,
Alister and a''s coming !

Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming ;
Jock and Tam and a' 's coming !

Borland and his men's coming,
The Camerons and Maclean's coming,
The Gordons and Macgregor's coming,
A' the Duniewastles coming!

Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming ;
MacGilvray o' Drumglass is coming !

Winton's coming, Nithsdale's coming,
Carnwath's coming, Kenmure's coming,
Derwentwater and Foster's coming,
Witbrington and Nairn's coming !

* From Johnson's Musical Museum, Part IV. 1792.
| Lowland and English partisans.

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Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wba's coming ;
Blythe Cowhill * and a' 's coming!

The Laird o' Macintosh is coming,
Macrabie and Macdonald's coming,
The Mackenzies and Macphersons coming,
A’ the wild MacCraws coming!

Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming ;
Donald Gun and a''s coming !

They gloom, they glowr, they look sae big,
At ilka stroke they'll fell a Whig ;
They'll fright the fuds of the Pockpuds ;
For mony a buttock bare's coming.

Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming,
Little wat ye wha's coming ;
Mony a buttock bare's coming! +

A gentleman of Dumfries-shire. + From Johnson's Musical Museum, vol. VI. 1803. The following anecdote is humbly submitted as an illustration of the allusion to the Highland dress in the last line.

Bare-faced Rebellion. For some time after the suppression of the insurrection of 1745, it was customary in miscellaneous parties to argue whether the term “ rebellion" was or was not applicable to that affair; the Whigs asserting that it was, and the Jacobites that it was not. One night, at a tea-drinking in the Old Town of Edinburgh, where this question was agitated, a Whig lady affirmed it to have been as “bare-faced”- that is, as unequivocal or certain, a rebellion as ever happened within the memory of man. In the heat of argument, she repeated this assertion several times : " It was a most bare-faced rebellion-as bare-faced a rebellion as could have happened-there never was a mair bare-faced rebellion !" The Honourable Andrew Erskine happened to be present; a gentleman who derived his predilections in favour of the House of Stewart at once from his father the Earl of Kelly, who had been “out in the Forty-five," and from his maternal grandfather, the famous Dr Pitcairn, than whom a more zealous cavalier never lived. When he heard this ludicrous re-iteration of the phrase “bare-faced rebellion," his mind was impressed with a grotesque idea which, though indelicate, he found it utterly impossible to keep to himself. Edging his chair towards the lady-disputant, he thus addressed her sideways, with the soft and sly expression peculiar to him :-" I'm no just clear, madam, that it could be ca'd a bare-faced rebellion ; but weel I wat, there's naebody can dispute but it was a bare-bottomed ane," It is unnecessary to describe the convulsive roar of transport, which instantaneously burst from all quarters of the room, and beneath which the unhappy disputant was immediately obliged to retire.

WIDOW, ARE YE WAUKIN?

ALLAN RAMSAY.

TUNE-Widow, are ye waukin?

O wha's that at my chamber-door?

Fair widow, are ye waukin ?
Auld carle, your suit give o'er,

Your love lies a' in tauking.
Gie me a lad that's young and tight,

Sweet like an April meadow;
'Tis sic as he can bless the sight

And bosom of a widow.

O widow, wilt thou let me in ?

I'm pawky, wise, and thrifty,
And come of a right gentle kin;

I'm little mair than fifty.
Daft carle, ye may

dicht
What signifies how pawky,
Or gentle-born ye be, bot youth?

In love you're but a gawky.

your mouth

;

Then, widow, let these guineas speak,

That powerfully plead clinkan;
And if they fail, my mouth I'll steek,

And nae mair love will think on.
These court indeed; I maun confess,

I think they make you young, sir,
And ten times better can express

Affection than your tongue, sir. *

« The

* From the Tea-Table Miscellany, (1724,) where it is wittily entitled,

uld Man's best Argument."

2 M

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