Fundamental Planetary Science: Physics, Chemistry and Habitability

Capa
Cambridge University Press, 16 de set de 2013 - 583 páginas
A quantitative introduction to the Solar System and planetary systems science for advanced undergraduate students, this engaging new textbook explains the wide variety of physical, chemical, and geological processes that govern the motions and properties of planets. The authors provide an overview of our current knowledge and discuss some of the unanswered questions at the forefront of research in planetary science and astrobiology today. They combine knowledge of the Solar System and the properties of extrasolar planets with astrophysical observations of ongoing star and planet formation, offering a comprehensive model for understanding the origin of planetary systems. The book concludes with an introduction to the fundamental properties of living organisms and the relationship that life has to its host planet. With more than 200 exercises to help students learn how to apply the concepts covered, this textbook is ideal for a one-semester or two-quarter course for undergraduate students.
 

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Conteúdo

Surfaces and Interiors
6
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25
1
51
1
84
Phy5cs and AstrophySIcs 64
109
E 2
144
Giant Planets
206
Key Concepts
223
440
465
Key Concepts
493
Symbols Used
501
Units and Constants
509
Solar System Tables
515
Interplanetary Spacecraft
527
Recent Planetary Images
533
References
553

Terrestrial Planets and the Moon
240
Planetary Satellites
266
Meteorites
284
258
300
Minor Planets and Comets
309
Planetary Rings
348
Key Concepts
373
Transit Timing Variations
387
348
396
Planet Formation
413
4
426
7
434
Small Bodies Orbiting the
438
Further Reading
447
1
453
204
559
32
561
303
562
522
565
403
566
43
567
322
569
482
570
226
572
413
575
337
576
515
578
242
580
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Sobre o autor (2013)

Jack J. Lissauer is a Space Scientist at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, and a consulting professor at Stanford University. His primary research interests are the formation of planetary systems, detection of extrasolar planets, planetary dynamics and chaos, planetary ring systems and circumstellar/protoplanetary disks. He is lead discoverer of the six-planet Kepler-11 system, co-discoverer of the first four planets found to orbit about faint M dwarf stars, and co-discoverer of two broad tenuous dust rings and two small inner moons orbiting the planet Uranus.

Imke de Pater is a Professor in the Astronomy Department and the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and is affiliated with the Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. She began her career observing and modeling Jupiter's synchrotron radiation, followed by detailed investigations of the planet's thermal radio emission. In 1994 she led a worldwide campaign to observe the impact of comet D/Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. Currently, she is exploiting adaptive optics techniques in the infrared range to obtain high angular resolution data of bodies in our Solar System.

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