Imagens da página
PDF
ePub

Newingland Indan Bible, and my great book of the signifing of names, and my book of the New Testement of eight langves; and all my fisekall things, that came from beyand the seay, with the ovt landesh cvp, and that thing that people doe give glisters with, and my tov diales, the one is an eknocksa diall.

And all my over pvesh bookes to be devided amovng my 4 sones in law; and also all my other bookes, and my hamack, I doe give to Thomas Lover, that is, at Bengamin Antrvbvs his closet, and Rachall may take that which is at Swarthmor.

And Thomas Lover may have my walnvt eqvnockshall diall, and if he can, he may geet one cut by it, which will be hard to doe; and hee shall have one of my prosspect glaseses in my trovnk at London, and a pare of my gloveses, and my seale G. F. and the flaming sword to Nat. Mead, and my other 2 seales J. Rose, the other Dan Abraham.

And Thomas Lover shall have my Spanesh lether hyd, G. F. And S. Mead shall have my mag. nifing glas, and the torkellshell pom and cace.

*II. And all that I have writ. ten, consaring what I doe give to my relashons, ether mony or other waes, Jhon Loft may put it up in my tronke at Jhon Elsones,and wright all things downe in a paper, and make a paper out of all my papers, how I have orderd things for them; and Jhon Loft may send all things dovn by Povelesworth carrer, in the trovnke, to Jhon Fox, at Povelesworth in Waricksher; and let John Fox send John Loft

boots, inward leathers, and the New England Indian Bible, and my great book of the signifying of names, and my book of the New Testament of eight languages; and all my physical things, that came from beyond the sea, with the outlandish cup, and that thing that people do give clysters with, and my two dials, the one is an equinoctial dial; and all my overplus books to be divided among my four sons-in-law: and also all my other books, and my hammock, I do give to Thomas Lower, that isat Benjamin Antrobus's closet; and Rachel may take that which is at Swarthmore; and Thomas may have my walnut-equinoctial dial, and if he can, he may get one cut by it, which will be hard to do; and he shall have one of my prospect glasses, in my trunk at London, and a pair of my gloves, and my seal, G. F. And the flaming sword to Nath. Mead, and my other two seals, J. Rouse, and the other, Daniel Abraham; and Thomas Lower shall have my Spanish leather hood, and S. Mead shall have my magnifying glass, and the tortoiseshell comb and case, G. F.

And all that I have written concerning what I do give to my relations, either money, or other. ways, John Loft may put it up in my trunk at John Elson's, and write all things down in a paper, and make a paper out of all my papers, how I have ordered things for them; and John Loft may send all things down by Poulsworth carrier, in the trunk, to John Fox, at Poulsworth, in Warwickshire; and let John Fox send John Loft a full a fvll receat and a discharge, and in this matter, and non of you may be consarned, but John Loft only; and my other lettell tronke, that standeth in Bengmin Antrubes is cloeset, with the ovtlandesh things,Thomas Lover shall have; and if it be ordered in any other papers to any other, that must not stand soe, but as now ordered, G. F. And Sary, thou may give Sary Frickenseld half a gine, for shee hath bene sarvesable to mee, a honest carfvll yovng womon, G. F.

* On the second, numb a. Thii u to be put up among George Fox's sealed up papen, (hat pacquet that Sarah Mead hath.

Make noe noves of thes thngs, but doe them in the life, as I have orderd them; and when all is don and cleared, what remenes to the printing of my bookes, Bengmin Antrvbves and Mary hath 100 pound of mine, take noe yoves of them for it, when yov doe reeve it.

And in my cheast, in Bengamen Antrvbs chamber, ther is a letell gilt box, with som gould in it; Sary Mead to take it, and let it doe sarveses amoung the rest, soe far as it will goe; the box is sealed up, G. F.

And let Thomas Docker, that knoeth many of my epeseles, and wrten books, which hee did wright, com vp to London, to assist frends in sorting of my epeselas, and other writings, and give him a gine, G. F.

•.III. I doe orde Wm. and Sa. Mead, and T. Lover, to take care of all my bookes and epeseles, and papers, that be at Benjniin Antrvbses, and at R. R. Chamber, and thoes that com from Swarth mor, and my Jornall of my Life, and the paseges and travells of frends, and to take them all into ther hands;

receipt, and a discharge, and in this matter none of youtmay be concerned, but John Loft only.

And my other little trunk that standeth in Benjamin Antrobus's closet, with the outlandish things, Thomas Lower shall have; and if it be ordered in any other papers to any other, that must not stand so, but as now ordered, G. F.

And Sarah, thou may give Sarah Freckleton half a guinea, for she hath been serviceable to me, an honest careful young woman, G. F. Make no noise of these things, but do them in the life, as I have ordered them:

And when all is done and cleared, what remains to the printing of my books, Benjamin Antrobus and Mary hath onehundred pounds of mine, take no use of them for it, when you do receive it.

And in my chest, in Benjamin Antrobus's chamber, there is a little gilt box, with some gold in it; Sarah Mead to take it, and let it do service among the rest, so far as it will go; the box is sealed up, G. F.

And let Thomas Dockra, that knoweth many of my epistles, and written books, which he did write, come up to London, to assist friends in sorting of my epistles, and other writings, and give him a guinea, G. F.

I do order William and Sarah Mead, and Thomas Lower, to take care of all my books and epistles, and papers, that be at Benjamin Antrobus's, and at R. R. Chamber, and those that come from Swarthmore, and my Journal of my Life, and the passages and travels of friends, and and all the over pluch of them the may have, and keep together as a libary, when the have gethered them together, which ar to be printd.

* On the thin!, numb. 3. For George Fox, to be laid in the trank. W. M. the eighth month tws.

And for them, to take charge of all my mony, and defray all as I have ordered in my other papers.

And any thing of mine the may take, and God will, and shall be ther reward: the 8 Mo, 1688.

Thomas Lover, and John Rovs, may assist yov, G. F.

And all the pasiges and trave. les and svferings of frinds, in the beging of the spreading of the trouth, which I have keept to. gether, will make a fine histery, and the may be had at Swarthmor, with my other bookes ; and if the com to London, with my papers, then the may be had, either at Wm. or Ben Antrubs closet, for it is a fine thing to know the beging of the spreading of the gospell, after soe long night of apostace, since the aposeles dayes, that now Christ raines, as he did in the harts of his people. Glory to the Lord, for ever, Amen, G. F.

The 8 Mon, 1688.

to take them all into their hands; and all the overplus of them they may have, and keep together as a library, when they have gathered them together, which are to be printed; and for them to take charge of all my money, and defray all, as I have ordered in my other papers; and any thing of mine they may take, and God will, and shall be their reward.

The 8th Month, 1688. G. F.

Thomas Lover, and John Rouse, may assist you: and all the passages, and travels, and sufferings of friends, in the beginning of the spreading of the truth, which I have kept together, will make a fine history, and they may be had at Swarthmore, with my other books; and if they come to London with my papers, then they may be had either at W. M. or Benjamin Antrobus's closet, for it is a fine thing to know the beginning of the spreading of the gospel, after so long night of apostasy, since the apos. ties days, that now Christ reigns, as he did in the hearts of his peo. pie. Glory to the Lord for ever, Amen.

G. F. The 8th Month, 1688.

The Date of the Administration, the Thirtieth of December, 1697.

Tbicesimo die mensls Deccmbris anno Domini millesimo, sexcente. simo, nonagesimo septimo emanavit commissio, Margarets Fox, relictae & legatariae nominate in testamento Georgii Fox, nuper de Swarthmore in comitatu Lancastrian, sed in parochia omnium Sane torum, Lombard-street,London, defuncti habentis, &c. Adadminis. trandum bona jura & credita dicti defuncti juxta tenorem & effectual testamenti ipsius defuncti (Eo quod nullum omnino nominaverit executorem) declaratione in praesentia Dei Omnipotentis, juxta statutum parliamenti in hac parte editum & provisum de bene & fideliter administrando eadem per dictam Margaretam Fox prius facta.

Tho. Wellham, rcgistrarii deputatuh.

The Persons hereafter named, by their solemn Declaration, sub* scribed under their hands, did affirm the above-written to be wrote with the proper hand of the said George Fox deceased, they being acquainted with his hand-writing.

S. Mead, wife of W. Mead, of the parish of St. Dyonis Back Church, London, citizen,and merchant taj lor of London.

W. Ingram, of the parish of St. Margaret, New Fish-street, London, aged about fifty-seven years; he knew George Fox, about forty years.

G. Whitehead, of the parish of St. Botolph without Bishopsgate, London, Gent. aged about sixty years, knew George Fox above forty years.

N. B. In this will, the pride and vanity of the deceiver is as notorious, as the credulity of his deluded followers. For what else could make him think, that his nasty comb and clyster-pipe would be such acceptable relicks among his friends? But this is he who first deluded them, their infallible Pope, and who to his death continued their admired idol. This is he who taught them to renounce their baptism, and the hope of a resurrection after death; and notwithstanding all their sly equivocations, by this his will is manifest, that he neither believed nor expected it. The reader is not to wonder that here is no confession of sin. Pope George alas! was all perfection and sinless, and his disciples have ever since so conceited of the sufficiency of their own merit, that no true quaker was ever known to die, with a Lord have mercy upon him in his mouth.

Letter fo King James, see Vol. i. p. 23.
Address for the French War, see Vol. i.p. 74,

THE PRESENT STATE OF EUROPE

BRIEFLY EXAMINED,
AND FOUND LANGUISHING;

OCCASIONED BY

THE GREATNESS OF THE FRENCH MONARCHY;
FOR CURE WHEREOF,

A REMEDY (FROM FORMER EXAMPLES)
IS HUMBLY PROPOSED.

Wrote upon Occasion of the House of Commons's Vote to raise j£800000. to equip a Fleet for the Year 1671, moved thereunto by the pretended March of the French Army, towards the Marine parts of Flanders. By Thomas Manley, Esq. 1689,

X. HE present designs and puissance of France, both by sea and land, being, at once, both the wonder and dread of Europe, hath possessed me with so many sad reflexions on that subject, that I, who am but dust and ashes, and dwell in the shades of obscurity, cannot refrain to form and meditate, how bars may be put to such approaching dangers, especially, since the honour, safety, and welfare of our prince and country ought to be the bent and study of the most retired subject.

The present state of Europe I might fitly resemble to the body of a man, wherein all the members either languish, or are viciously affected; some through self-mischiefs, others oppressed by their fellow members. Spain (heretofore the great pretender to the western monarchy *) droops through her own follies +, whereof, if she ex.. pire, a jury will undoubtedly find her afelo de se, while her neighbour Portugal, instead of holding her sick head, and pitying her case, is ready, on all occasions, to knock out her brains. Italy and Germany are troubled with one disease, through the windy humours of her many and ambitious princes, whose continual jealousies fill them with gripings and disquiets: England and Holland are despe, rately bruised through mutual buffetings, to which France cunningly looed them on J, intending like Simeon and Levi, to suppress these Sechemites ||, when sore and unable to resist, all which mistakes

* fill Oliver Cromwell enabled France to raise the same ambitious views upon the ruins of Spain.

t 8ee the rights of the house of Austria to the Spanish succession, in vol. x- of this collection, anno 1701.

t Alluding to the unnatural war proclaimed by King Charles the Second, against Holland, by the instigation of France.

I England and Holland, when wasted in their strength and wealth, by a long and bloody war.

« AnteriorContinuar »