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IDYL I.

THYRSIS.

ARGUMENT.

The shepherd Thyrsis and a goatherd are introduced, praising

each other. Thyrsis then entreats the goatherd to play on the pipe, which he declines doing from fear of Pan; but requests Thyrsis to sing for him the song on the death of Dapbnis, promising to reward him with a milch-goat and a bighly wrought cup, which is minutely described. Thyrsis invokes the nymphs, and proceeds with his song.

Wild animals, and the herds, wail for Daphnis ; Mercury and Priapus, the guardians of the country and of shepherds, visit him and endeavour to enliven him. He does not answer them, but when Venus taunts him with his incapacity to resist love, he breaks out into invectives against her. He finally bids farewell to life, which ceases with bis words, Venus in vain endeavouring to resuscitate him.

IDYL I.

THYRSIS.

THYRSIS AND A GOATHERD.

THYRSIS.

Sweet is the music which the whispering pine
Makes to the murmuring fountains; sweet is thine,
Breathed from the pipe: the second prize thy due-
To Pan, the horned ram ; to thee, the ewe ;
And thine the yearling, when the eve he takes -
A savoury mess the tender yearling makes.

GOATHERD.

Sweeter thy song than yonder gliding down
Of water from the rock's o'erhanging crown ;

Thine, Thyrsis, this twin-bearing goat shall be,
That fills, two milk-pails thrice a-day for me ;
And this deep ivy-cup with sweetest wax
Bedewed, twin-eared, that of the graver smacks.
Around its lips lush ivy twines on high,
Sprinkled with drops of bright cassidony ;
And as the curling ivy spreads around,
On
every

curl the saffron fruit is found.
With flowing robe and Lydian head-dress on,
Within a woman to the life is done
An exquisite design ! on either side
Two men with flowing locks each other chide,
By turns contending for the woman's love,
But not a whit her mind their pleadings move.
One while she gives to this a glance and smile,
And turns and smiles on that another while.
But neither any certain favour gains —
Only their eyes are swollen for their pains.
Hard by, a rugged rock and fisher old,
Who drags a mighty net, and seems to hold
Preparing for the cast : he stands to sight,
A fisher putting forth his utmost might.
A youth's strength in the gray-head seems to dwell,
So much the sinews of his neck outswell.

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