The Evolution of Useful Things

Capa
Vintage Books, 1994 - 288 páginas
Only Henry Petroski, author of The Pencil, could make one never pick up a paper clip again without being overcome with feelings of awe and reverence. In his new book the author examines a host of techno-trivia questions - how the fork got its tines, why Scotch tape is called that, how the paper clip evolved, how the Post-it note came to be, how the zipper was named, why aluminum cans have hollow bottoms - and provides us with answers that both astonish and challenge the imagination. In addition to an extended discussion of knives, forks, spoons, and other common devices, the author explains how the interplay of social and technical factors affects the development and use of such things as plastic bags, fast-food packaging, push-button telephones, and other modern conveniences. Throughout the book familiar objects serve to illustrate the general principles behind the evolution of all products of invention and engineering. Petroski shows, by way of these examples as well as a probing look at the patent process, that the single most important driving force behind technological change is the failure of existing devices to live up to their promise. As shortcomings become evident and articulated, new and "improved" versions of artifacts come into being through long and involved processes variously known as research and development, invention, and engineering. He further demonstrates how the evolving forms of technology generally are altered by our very use of them, and how they, in turn, alter our social and cultural behavior. In this wonderful mixture of history, biography, and design theory, Henry Petroski brings us to an understanding of an essential question: By what mechanism do theshapes and forms of our made world come to be?
 

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LibraryThing Review

Comentário do usuário  - SeriousGrace - LibraryThing

Did you ever stop to think that the four-tined fork which brings food to your mouth and the two-tined fork you use to hold meat while carving it came from the same food necessity and that they are ... Ler resenha completa

LibraryThing Review

Comentário do usuário  - jen.e.moore - LibraryThing

Though a little bit dated, this is an interesting discussion of how design and invention work. Rather than "form follows function," Petroski argues, form follows *failure* - specifically the failure ... Ler resenha completa

Conteúdo

Preface
5
Form Follows Failure
22
From Pins to Paper Clips
51
Little Things Can Mean a
79
Stick Before Zip
92
Tools Make Tools
114
Patterns of Proliferation
130
Domestic Fashion and Industrial Design
154
The Power of Precedent
171
When Good Is Better Than Best
220
Always Room for Improvement
237
Notes
253
List of Illustrations
275
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Sobre o autor (1994)

Henry Petroski is the Aleksander S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of History at Duke University. He is the author of more than ten books.

Informações bibliográficas