Human Body Size and the Laws of Scaling: Physiological, Performance, Growth, Longevity and Ecological Ramifications

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This book is an exploration not only of the lessons that Abraham Lincoln, America's sixteenth president, drew from the founders of the United States, especially, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, but also how others abroad have interpreted and incorporated his legacy. Because Lincoln occupied the presidency during democracy's first great civil war, he set a precedent for other leaders at home and abroad. "Liberal" leaders tend to identify with his roles as the Great Emancipator and magnanimous Great Reconciler, who eschewed "ethnic cleansing" in favour of restoring the Union as soon as possible after secession.

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Inhalt

Abraham Lincolns George Washington
1
Abraham Lincolns Thomas Jefferson
39
Washingtons Farewell Address and Lincolns Lyceum Address
77
Jefferson Lincoln and Religious Freedom
95
Invoking the Framers The LincolnDouglas Debates
113
Lincoln Seward and the United Kingdom
123
Thomas Jefferson Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties The Balance of Liberty and Security
135
Ex Parte Milligan Lincolns Use of Military Commissions
155
The Rectitude of Their Intentions Proclaiming Independence in Philadelphia and Tel Aviv
169
About the Contributors
185
Index
187
Urheberrecht

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Seite 86 - Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of Men and Citizens. The mere Politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity.
Seite 81 - It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels no government would be necessary.
Seite 158 - Must a government, of necessity, be too strong for the liberties of its own people, or too weak to maintain its own existence...
Seite 103 - And, in short, let it become the political religion of the nation; and let the old and the young, the rich and the poor, the grave and the gay of all sexes and tongues and colors and conditions, sacrifice unceasingly upon its altars.
Seite 66 - Neither let us be slandered from our duty by false accusations against us, nor frightened from it by menaces of destruction to the government, nor of dungeons to ourselves. Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith let us to the end dare to do our duty as we understand it.
Seite 72 - This is essentially a people's contest. On the side of the Union it is a struggle for maintaining in the world that form and substance of Government whose leading object is to elevate the condition of men...
Seite 97 - American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between Church and State.
Seite 81 - As there is a degree of depravity in mankind, which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust : so there are other qualities in human nature, which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence. Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form.
Seite 58 - But in the right to eat the bread, without the leave of anybody else, which his own hand earns, he is my equal and the equal of Judge Douglas, and the equal of every living man.
Seite 89 - The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the constitution which at any time exists till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.

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