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Matthew and Luke. To such, this will be a valuable assistant, not from any peculiar novelty with which the difficulty is disposed of, but from the fact that it presents the fair and candid views of an enlightened Jewish teacher, who, having satisfied his own mind on the subject, offers the result as a guide to others.

Tracts published for gratuitous distribution by the Jewish Association for the

diffusion of Religious Knowledge, 7, Bevis Marks. ld. each, 6d. per dozen. We earnestly commend the perusal of this series to our Christian readers. We believe they are adapted to remove some misconceptions as to the views and feelings of our Jewish brethren, and may indicate the course which our prayers and intercourse should take concerning them. They are, for the most part, written with simplicity and gracefulness, and the highest moral sentiments are pleaded with much earnestness. We thank God for what He is doing, while yet we mourn the absence of motives, aspirations, and hopes, which Christianity alone can supply. How justly may it be said, they are “without a prince, and without a sacrifice, and without an image, and without an ephod, and without teraphim.” (Hosea iii. 4, 5.) Christ and His cross are not in sight. The best hope we have is, that the spirit of prayer is fervently evoked. Just in proportion as this is responded to, will our hopes be enkindled. It is on the knee of prayer that Israel will be blessed, and on the suppliant that the Spirit will descend. (Zech, xii. 10.)

The following is a favourable specimen, taken from the tract on Prayer :

“ Then again, some portions of the prayers call to mind the past—the time when God's glory was enthroned in His temple in Zion,—when Jerusalem was the world's delight,—when captivity was unknown to Israel's sons and daughters,-ere the heathen trod the consecrated ground. Will not the memory of those days call up a host of sad, yet pleasing recollections ? Will it not rouse noble aspirations within our breast ? Will not the mournful memories of the past, and the bright hopes of the future, relieve us from slavishly clinging to the all-absorbing worldly present?

“Recollect that prayer is not a form, but a direct communion with the Almighty. Away then with your callousness! Be not indifferent to the boon held out to you. It is your Creator who calls upon you to accept it. Shall He call in vain ? Say not, “I have no need of prayer ;' for, by so saying, you would belie your own innermost feelings, and contradict the emphatic declaration of the Most High.

“Sneer not at the prayers composed by our forefathers; rather try to understand them, to be imbued with their spirit-a spirit of holy ecstasy, of humility, of adoration and gratitude. Look well into your heart, carefully regulate your feelings. Perform this task diligently, and cease not until you feel yourself inspired with a holy spirit. Then you will be worthy to approach before the throne of our Maker with prayer—then you will be worthy to address unto Him words of supplication. Then you may rest assured that your prayer will be heard—that your God will be entreated by you, and will grant your petition, if it be for your good. But be certain that, in any case, your supplication will not be in vain; for even if your petition be not granted, your prayer will bring you nearer to your God-nearer to the source of Goodness, of Power, and of Strength.

"" The Lord is nigh unto all who call upon Him,—to all who call upon Him with sincerity.'"

The British Workman. Published Monthly, by S. W. PARTRIDGE,

9, Paternoster Row. We are glad to have had our attention again called to this really valuable publication. It appears peculiarly adapted to diffuse cheerful piety through a working man's heart and home, and must shame away the ribaldry which, while it has amused, has degraded the taste, and gradually undermined moral and religious principles.

The illustrations are beautiful, and may well fill the portfolios brought out on a winter evening. The Children's Friend. Published Monthly, by S. W. PARTRIDGE,

9, Paternoster Row. “ The Children's Friend” is very attractive, and quite suited to the age and needs for whom it is intended.

The Life-Boat, Journal of the National Life-Boat Institution,

14, John Street, Adelphi. Our insular position gives us on all sides an acquaintance with the perils of the sea, and very few must be the families not, more or less, intimately connected with those who " go down to the sea in ships, and who do business in great waters." To such, this quarterly publication ought to be of deepest interest. Indeed, everything that awakens sympathy and fellow-feeling towards the brave men who line our coasts, or man our ships should be valued. We earnestly commend the Journal to general attention and support.

During 11 years it is stated that, on the coasts of Britain alone, 6,883 lost their lives, while it appears that during the past 5 years the number of lives saved on the coasts by life-boats, apparatus, &c., &c., amounts to 11,495. In recommending the publication, may we not appeal for prayer and Christian effort on behalf of those who are in death often, and sometimes go down in the depths in a moment?

CONTRIBUTIONS IN AID OF THE SOCIETY,

From February 23, to March 26, 1862.
SUBSCRIPTIONS & DONATIONS.

Barswater, Wesleyan Chapel. 2 11 10
Bow, Harley-street Chapel

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A Friend ....

... 1 0 0 A Friend, by Mr. Acworth .. 3 0 0 A Priend, by Mrs. Hinton 0 100 Butterworth, W., Esq.,Surbiton 1 1 0 Dawson, J., Es

1 1 0 Denniston, Rev. J. M..... 1 1 0 Ducat, Mrs., Coll. by ..... 060 Enis, Miss, Coll. by.... 0 13 0 Hall, Miss, Valtkumstou 2 2 0 Haldane, V., Esg.

5 0 0 Harrison, Miss, Coll. by 1 10 0 Hugbes, W. H., Esq.

1 1 0 Peek, J., Esq.

1 1 0 Ratclife, Miss ............. 0 50 Roberts, Miss...

Bishop's Stortford

S 100

1 126 Bradford, Yorks

23 14 0 Bridgend

6 4 6
Brixton, Trinity Chapel, Coll. 4 0 0

Mr. Ginger ......... 1 0 0
Miss Clifford, Coll.. 8 10 0
Miss Muscatt

1 0 0
Bursiem
Bath

10 0 0
Bedale

4 18 9 Berkhampstead, Coll.

3 1 0 Boston ...

5 6 3 Barnard Castle

3 11 0 Bideford

Devizes.........

7 12 6 Dover

10 1 1 Dunstable, Coll.

15 13 9 Do., Subs.

1 10 4 Durham

4 1 11 Easingwold .........

0 JO 0 Falmouth...

2 10 6 Falcon-square Chapel

8 10 0 Gravesend, Coll.

2 15 7 Grimsby ...

5 19 0 Henley-on-Thames, Coll.,... 2 0 0

by Coll.

6 6 23 by Mrs. Hudson 1 13 7 Hitchin, Coll...

2 9 il Subs.....

3 6 0 Hungerford, Coll.

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0 2 0 Sunday Schools, by Mr. T. Taylor ....

0 16 41 Surrey, Mrs., Coll. by

5 00 Spicer, H., Esq. ....

1 1 0 Do. J., Esq.......

1 1 0 Tapson, Mrs.

0 100 Waiker, Rey, S., by Mrs. Ducat

050 Webster, Mr., by do. ........

0 5 0 Wood, Rer, J., Heytesbury 0 2 6

ASSOCIATIONS & COLLECTIONS.
Appleton Wiske, Miss Nelson 3 0 0
Ashton-under-Lyne, by Mrs.
Gartside ....

12 00
Do. by Miss Lees ........ 17 10 0
Alnwick....
Aylesbury, Coll. ............

1 60
4 8 3

4 17 0 Boxmoor, Coll.

1 16 0 Bramley

7 11 4 Bradford, Wilts

6 36 Brayton...

3 00 Brentford

2 2 6 Bridgewater

10 11 4 Bridport

9 16 2 Buckingham, Coll.

1 0 0 Birmingham..

23 00 Cam

2 10 8 Cambridge

27 16 8 Chatteris ........

1 17 6 Chorley

1 19 6 Colchester ......

6 0 0 Congleton.........

6 5 2 Chatham

415 0
Claremont Chapel, Coll...... 10 0 8

Subscriptions 4 1 5
Craven Chapel

.............. 14 6 3
Dunmow

4 12 0

3 0 0 Subs.

5 0 0 Hadleigh..

B00 Halifax

37 14 0 Halstead

1 10 0 Hammersmith

1 18 6 Do.....

16 12 6 Hexham

2 3 6 Highgate Ind. Chapel

2 2 0 Hitchin.

5 12 0 Horbury Chapel

10 13 0 Houghton Regis, Coll.

450 Hull Hereford

4 130 Ilfracombe

076
Kingston-on-Thames.... 1 17 0
Launceston (T. Good, E.q.).. 1 1 0
Leighton Buzzard, Coll ...... 1 17 0

D). by Rey, J. Walcot.. 0 14 0
Do.
A Friend ........

076 ........ 20 4 2}

.***....... 2 6 0

Lincoln ......,

99

CONTRIBUTIONS IN AID OF THE SOCIETY- Continued).

MISSION TO ITALY.

£ $. d. Lostwithiel

1 0 0 Leicester ....

24 14 6 Lutterworth

0 13 9 Liceby

1 12 0 Mansfield, Coll..

1 12 0 Market Rasen

1 15 6 Neath

3 00 Newcastle-on-Tyne..

12 4 11 Northallerton....

2 5 6 Nottingham, Coll.

10 00 Northampton.....

0 10 0 Norwich..

27 15 7 Old Basford, Coll.....

0 10 0 Pickering

5 1 10 Reading, Coll..

4 12 11 Mr. Barcham

6 0 0 Subs.

7 6 11 Thank Offering by

Miss Frankunn .. 1 0 0 Ramsgate....

3 13 6 Rhoslyan, &c............

4 19 0 Rugby.......

8 0 0 Saffron Walden

7 10 0 St. Ives...

0119 St. Albans, Coll.....

1 15 6 St. Mawes

1 1) 3 Shrewsbury..

6 19 3 Sloane-terrace Chapel

1 5 0 Southwark Wesleyan Chapel ! 5 1 Staleybridge .....

5 18 1 Stoney Stratford, Coll ...... 5 12 5 Sutherland Chapel, Walworth 5 10 0 Sutton-in-Ashfield, Coll. .... 0 10 9 South Molton .....

0 180 Stafford.......

2 10 1

Stokesler

1 0 0 Surrey Chapel....

0 12 6 Stebbing ..

1 150
Sudbury .........

2 5 5
Swindon
Tooting, Coll ......

3 16 11
Trowbridge..

7 3 6 Wattisfield

2 120
Wellington..

3 100
Westerham Ind. S. Schoo', by
Mr. J. C arke

0871
Wolverhampton............. 6 16' 0
Worcester.....

200 Whitehaven ....

2 08
Walthamstow, Young Ladies

at West Grove House 0 10 0
Warminster
Welford

0 18 6
Westminster Chip., Mr. Millne 1 0 0

Mr. Hastings 0 5 0

Miss Besley 0 2 0
Windsor, Coll....

1 50
York....

.... 17 14 4

A Friend at Paris, by Rev. W.
Ritchie .....

100 frs. Ashton-under-Lyne...... £10 0 0 Bridport

100 Boardman, Mr............... 050 Cooper, Miss ..

5 00 Falcon-square Chapel ...... Hores, J., Esq...

100 Hoffland, Mr., Hungerford.... 10. Staleybridge

2 12 6 Trowbridge

2 19 6 Error in March “Herald :" - Rigly.

Esq., (Warrington,) should have
been £2.

FUND FOR DR. BENDI1.
Miss Cooper

500 By Rev. R. B. Herschell .... 1000 Miss Merrifield

0 17 0 Messrs. Tomlinson, Newark: M.E.D., Lombard-street 1 0 0 Miss Readhou.e ..........

0 10-0 Friend of the Jews ...... Mrs. Brooks

020 Mrs. C. Baily

0 1 0 A Stranger

0 30 A Friend (B) ........

0 10 0 Mrs. D.

0 1 6 A Friend ............

0 2 0 SEPARATE RELIEF FUNDMiss Knox .................. 100

Pari, per Ror W. Ritchie -
A Friend, per Rer. W. H.
Wilson

........ (frs.) 10
A Friend.

2 Miss A. Knight ............, 20 Mr. Skipper ...

5 Wesleyan Chapel, Coll, . 24 700 Mrs. Ritchie ....

25 Rev. W. Ritchie ..........

25

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£ s. d. Feb. 2 Nottingham-George-st. Chapel Sermon Rev. C. D Ginsburg

Halifax place Chapel
Old Basford
Lecture
Rev. T. Lovekin

0 10 6 4 Nottingham-CastleGate Meeting Meeting House

man, F. Forbes, T. Eglinton, and

J. Cole, Esq.
5
Sutton in-Ashfield-Indep. Ch. Lecture

Mr. Adin, Rev. c. Wilson.

0 10 9 6 Mansfield-Wesleyan Sch. Room

W. Wilson, Esq.

1 120 9 Dunstable-Wesleyan Ch. Sermon

Afternoon, Indep. Chp. Address
Evening, Baptist Chapel Sermon

11 5 8 . 10 Baptist Ch. Meeting

Revs. D. Gould, S. E. Dodge, G. Barn 4 81

ley, and G. Robinson, Esq. 11 Leighton Buzzard-Wesleyan Ch Lecturo

Revs. W. Walcott and S. Samuel

1 17 » 12 Aylesbury-Wesleyan Ch.

Rev. W. Gates, Messrs. Ward and c. 1 60

Madder 13 Puckingham-Independent Ch.

Rev. S. Bellamy 18 Newport Pagnell-Town Hall

Rev. J. Bull, M.A. » 16 Houghton Regis-Baptist Ch. Serinon

3 00 Luton-Urion Coapel

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Sermons iz Houghton Regis-Baptist Ch. Meeting

Revs. G. H. Davies, D. Gould,' and s. 1 50

Dodge » 18 Berkhampstead-Independent Ch Sermon

3 1 0 » 19 St. Albans-Baptist Ch.

Lecture
Rev. W. Upton

1 15 6 » 20 | Bormoor-Baptist Ch.

Meeting

Revs C. 1. Leonard, M.A, T. H Cook, 1 16 0

J.J. Steintz, and W. Emery 23 Słoney Stratford- Independent. Sermor.s

5 12 5 and Baptist Ch. 21 Hitelin-Independent Ch. Lecture Rey, J. Gill Rors. Griffith, Short, and Payne

2 9 11 26 Westminster Chapel Mar. 3 Breton-Trinity Ch.

Rev. s Eldridge

4 0 0 5 Gravesend-Windmill-st. Ch.

Rer. E. S. Pryce, B.A.

2 15 7 12 Reading-Broad-street Ch.

Rev. W. Legge, B.A.

4 12 11 16 Claremont Chapel Sermon

10 08 18 Hungerford-Town Hall Lecture

Rev. Theodore Davies

3 00 > 19 Henley-on-Thames-Indep. Ch.

Rev J. Rowland 20 Bos-Harley-street Chapel

Rev. W. Bevan 23 Tooting-Independent ch.

3 16 11 26 Windsor-Wesleyan Ch.

Reve. Jefferies and Lillycrop

150 11 Chatteris-Baptist Ch.

Mr. Sternberg Revs. Lyon, Wilkins, and Rowe 18 Bath-Percy Ch.

Pub. Seet. Rev. J. Wilkinson T. Thompson, Esq.,.- Jefferson, Esq 10 OO

1 T. A. West

Rers. Frindley, Wassell, Bond, and
N.B.-Where asterisks appear in the Collection column, the amount collected has not been reported.

99

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The Monthly Meeting for Prayer, with and on behalf of the Jews, will be held at the Office of the Society, on April 16, at 7 o'clock.

London : Published by JOHN SNOW, 35, Paternoster Row.
Printed for the Society by Adams and Gee, at 23, Middle Street, West Smithfeld, E.C.–No. 195.- April 1, 1882.

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"PUBLISH YE, PRAISE YE, AND SAY, O LORD, SAVE THY PEOPLE, THE REMNANT

OF ISRAEL."

OFFICE:-No. 1, CRESCENT PLACE, BLACKFRIARS, LONDON.

No. 197.)

MAY 1, 1862.

[Price ld.

The Missions.

ITALY, DR. MAYER's lively description of affairs in Italy enables us to identify ourselves with his position, and the description of his experiences among the Jews is well adapted to call forth praise and supplication :

Leghorn, April 10, 1862. Things and people here are in general in a marvellous state of confusion. Italy is a name, and a name only, of an unborn child, though I hope that the moment of delivery is very near. God grant it ; otherwise the loss in the future will be greater than the gain of the past. Things, events, and circumstances begin to assume a very gloomy aspect. The Government is weak because of not seeing their way clear; people are impetuous, because of seeing nothing ; priests are crafty, because of having been so for centuries ; the poor are rebellious, because of being prompted ; the rich are quiet, because of being afraid of noise ; the highways are dangerous to pass, because of the increasing wickedness and daring of numerous highwaymen ; religion is an unknown thing, because of the innumerable friars and monks ; Roman Catholics hate Protestants more than ever, because of the Waldensians ; and Protestantism gains daily ground among Romans and Jews, because of the Bishops and Rabbis. The latter fact, of course, causes us to rejoice and be thankful—but what of the preceding? Where is the Italian Government which can unite Italy, in spite of Rome being the seat of a powerful reaction, and in spite of the hatred of the Southern provinces against Piedmont? What will be the end of people's impetuosity, in sight of a Government's weakness to resist? Is it not indubitable that priests use and abuse the feebleness of the leaders of the country for their own benefit ? Facts? Well, we have facts of everything stated.

Thus much of Gentiles. Let me now speak of my Jewish brethren, inasmuch as I can give you some particulars, besides those you may glean from my previous letters. In referring to them, I give you first a short résumé as follows :A large congregation of (rather more than less) 15,000 souls, mostly of Spanish

VOL. XVII.—NEW SERIES, VOL. VIII.

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and African origin, with a beautiful Chief Synagogue, and several small ones, a well regulated school, with no less than 800 pupils, eight rabbis, three readers, and one killer (Shochet). The rabbis are mostly employed as teachers in the school, besides which they are compelled to give private lessons, on account of the very small salaries they get. The service in the synagogue is according to the Portuguese rite, strictly orthodox, though the members are in general very indifferent, with more or less inclination to a reform. With more than a hundred I have Christian intercourse, and of a good many among this number I entertain great hopes. The one I baptised on Christmas-day, and who has been dismissed by his English superiors in the Maremma, for his zeal to preach the Gospel to the ignorant population there in consequence of which there are now above 200 converts, to whom Dr. Revell, of Florence, promised me to send an Evangelist), I now employ here among the Jews. He is very useful, by his activity and popularity; knows Hebrew, and speaks Italian fluently. The two unbaptised converts are growing in grace daily; they study diligently, and are very talented. Truly you seldom meet with such two young, able, sincere, and quiet Jews. Mr. F, from Florence, who studies still in Pisa, intends to get his diploma there in the course of next summer, and then he will make a public confession of his faith in Christ, being then quite independent. Mr. P-- is still my regular visitor thrice a week. He is a good Christian in his heart, but, whilst he stays in his father's business, he cannot receive baptism. On the 26th of this month he is going to leave for Alexandria, in Egypt, to establish there a business of his own. There he will make profession and confession of his Christianity. May the Lord bless him in all his doings! Mr.

the son-in-law of Rabbi -, requested me the other day to receive him in our Christian community. I intended to comply with his wish in the vestry of the Scotch Church, assisted by Dr. Stewart; he has, however, left this week for Naples, on account of which the holy act must be deferred until his return in a fortnight or three weeks. Mr. E--, a young man of twenty-eight years of age, a member of a most respectable family in Florence, is prepared to receive baptism, and I intend to go to Florence for the purpose next week. Mr. P--, merchant, and Mr. C-, an independent man, get regular instruction in my house, and are very anxious indeed to grow in the knowledge of Christianity. My intercourse with the families F--, B--A--A-, M--T--, -, B-, and A-, in all twenty-five adults, becomes more and more intimate. I hope to give you very soon a most favourable account of Mr. L-R, the young student, of whom our friend, Mr. Davidson, gave you last year some information.

The following is extracted and translated from an Italian newspaper, by Mr. DAVIDSON, who thus prefaces it :-“I send you an extract from a newspaper, which I translated into English. I doubt not but what you will find it exceedingly interesting. Besides that, it treats of the Jews in the Papal States, and, as such, is suitable for insertion in the HERALD. It also shows the spirit and fearlessness in which Catholics now write in Italy:"

ROMISH TOLERATION. If the offences against God are, in the estimation of the church, the least deserying of pardon, every one who, at least in name, is not a Catholic in the sight of the Pope is a reprobate.

Of such reprobates there exists a great number. The geographer Balbi counts 600,000,000 of them upon the surface of the earth. The Pope, though he damns them all, does not now collect armies, as he was wont to do, in order to make war against them here below.

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