The Boy's Own Book;: A Complete Encyclopedia of All the Diversions, Athletic, Scientific, and Recreative, of Boyhood and Youth..

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Vizetelly, Branston and Company, 1829 - 462 Seiten
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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - AgedPeasant - LibraryThing

A very full and surprisingly energetic guide to sports and pastimes, from science to breeding pigeons. The chapter on learning to swim is a hoot. Lovely illustrations. Vollständige Rezension lesen

Nutzerbericht  - Michelle - Christianbook.com

My son saved his money to buy this book himself and is very disappointed in it. The print is very small making it difficult to read and the old english is rather tedious for a 10 year old (and we read ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

I
7
II
9
III
13
IV
15
V
21
VI
25
VII
29
VIII
41
XXII
199
XXIII
223
XXIV
225
XXV
227
XXVI
241
XXVII
261
XXVIII
283
XXIX
289

IX
43
X
51
XI
57
XII
75
XIII
95
XIV
97
XV
129
XVI
149
XVII
151
XVIII
173
XIX
179
XX
195
XXI
197
XXX
303
XXXI
305
XXXII
315
XXXIII
339
XXXIV
341
XXXV
389
XXXVI
401
XXXVII
409
XXXVIII
411
XXXIX
415
XL
431
XLI
447

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 31 - Fitzstephen, it was customary in the winter, when the ice would bear them, for the young citizens of London to fasten the leg bones of animals under the soles of their feet by tying them round their ancles, and then taking a pole shod with iron into their hands, they pushed themselves forward by striking it against the ice, and moved with celerity equal, says the author, to a bird flying through the air, or an arrow from a cross-bow...
Seite 134 - ... is an imprudence which may prove fatal. I once knew an instance of four young men, who, having worked at harvest in the heat of the day, with a view of refreshing themselves, plunged into a spring of cold water ; two died upon the spot, a third next morning, and the fourth recovered with great difficulty. A copious draught of cold water, in similar circumstances, is frequently attended with the same effect, in North America. " The exercise of swimming is one of the most healthy and agreeable...
Seite 134 - When I was a boy, I amused myself one day with flying a paper kite ; and approaching the iJank of a pond, which was near a mile broad, I tied the string to a stake, and the kite ascended to a very considerable height above the pond, while I was swimming. In a little time, being desirous of amusing myself with my kite, and enjoying at the same time the pleasure of swimming, I returned ; and, loosing...
Seite 439 - twas permitted to rest, And the depths of the ocean its presence confessed. 'Twill be found in the sphere when 'tis riven asunder, Be seen in the lightning, and heard in the thunder ; 'Twas allotted to man with his earliest breath, Attends at his birth and awaits him in death, Presides o'er his happiness, honour, and health, Is the prop of his house, and the end of his wealth.
Seite 238 - ... for the value of the twenty-fourth nail in his shoes, reckoning one farthing for the first nail, two for the second, four for the third, and so on to the twenty-fourth.
Seite 239 - If 100 stones are placed in a straight line, at the distance of a yard from each other ; how far must a person travel, to bring them one by one to a box placed at the distance of a yard from the first stone 1 QUEST.
Seite 35 - How MANY miles to Babylon? Three score miles and ten. Can I get there by candle-light? Yes, and back again.
Seite 450 - ... for a considerable space, and beyond them so much thinner as to be invisible, except in its effect of smoothing the waves at a much greater distance. It seems as if a mutual repulsion between its particles took place as soon as it touched the water, and a repulsion so strong as to act on other...
Seite 439 - Twas muttered in Hell, And echo caught faintly The sound as it fell. On the confines of earth 'Twas permitted to rest, And the depths of the ocean Its presence confessed.
Seite 133 - The body continuing suspended as before, and upright, if the head be leaned quite back, so that the face look upward, all the back part of the head being under water, and its weight consequently in a great measure supported by it, the face will remain above water quite free for breathing, will rise an inch higher every inspiration, and sink as much every expiration ; but never so low as that the water may come over the mouth.

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