Eugenics: A Reassessment

Capa
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001 - 366 páginas

Lynn argues that the condemnation of eugenics in the second half of the 20th century went too far and offers a reassessment. The eugenic objectives of eliminating genetic diseases, increasing intelligence, and reducing personality disorders he argues, remain desirable and are achievable by human biotechnology. In this four-part analysis, Lynn begins with an account of the foundation of eugenics by Francis Galton and the rise and fall of eugenics in the twentieth century. He then sets out historical formulations on this issue and discusses in detail desirability of the new eugenics of human biotechnology. After examining the classic approach of attempting to implement eugenics by altering reproduction, Lynn concludes that the policies of classical eugenics are not politically feasible in democratic societies.

The new eugenics of human biotechnology--prenatal diagnosis of embryos with genetic diseases, embryo selection, and cloning--may be more likely than classic eugenics to evolve spontaneously in western democracies. Lynn looks at the ethical issues of human biotechnologies and how they may be used by authoritarian states to promote state power. He predicts how eugenic policies and dysgenic processes are likely to affect geopolitics and the balance of power in the 21st century. Lynn offers a provocative analysis that will be of particular interest to psychologists, sociologists, demographers, and biologists concerned with issues of population change and intelligence.

 

O que estão dizendo - Escrever uma resenha

Não encontramos nenhuma resenha nos lugares comuns.

Conteúdo

III
3
IV
18
V
45
VI
47
VII
59
VIII
72
IX
78
X
97
XVII
187
XVIII
205
XIX
215
XX
225
XXI
243
XXII
245
XXIII
258
XXIV
274

XI
108
XII
116
XIII
135
XIV
137
XV
150
XVI
165
XXV
292
XXVI
307
XXVII
321
XXVIII
355
Direitos autorais

Termos e frases comuns

Passagens mais conhecidas

Página 4 - We greatly want a brief word to express the science of improving stock, which is by no means confined to questions of judicious mating, but which, especially in the case of man, takes cognisance of all influences that tend in however remote a degree to give to the more suitable races or strains of blood a better chance of prevailing speedily over the less suitable than they otherwise would have had.
Página 9 - Consequently, as it is easy, notwithstanding those limitations, to obtain by careful selection a permanent breed of dogs or horses gifted with peculiar powers of running, or of doing anything else, so it would be quite practicable to produce a highly-gifted race of men by judicious marriages during several consecutive generations.
Página 8 - So the race gradually deteriorates, becoming in each successive generation less fitted for a high civilization, although it retains the external appearances of one, until the time comes when the whole political and social fabric caves in, and a greater or less relapse to barbarism takes place, during the reign of which the race is perhaps able to recover its tone.
Página 6 - If a man is gifted with vast intellectual ability, eagerness to work, and power of working, I cannot comprehend how such a man should be repressed. The world is always tormented with difficulties waiting to be solved — struggling with ideas and feelings, to which it can give no adequate expression. If, then, there exists a man capable of solving...

Sobre o autor (2001)

RICHARD LYNN is Professor Emeritus of Psychology, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland./e Professor Lynn has held positions at the University of Exeter and the Dublin Economic and Social Research Institute. Among his earlier publications are Educational Achievement in Japan and Dysgenics: Genetic Deterioration in Modern Populations (Praeger, 1996).

Informações bibliográficas