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Some have the city in their care,
From noxious steams to purge the air ;
Some teach us in these dang'rous days
How to walk upright in our ways ;
Some whose reforming hands engage
To lafh the lewdness of the age ;
Some for the public service go
Perpetual envoys to and fro;
Whose able heads support the weight
of twenty ministers of state.
We scorn, for want of talk, to jabber
Of parties o'èr our bonny-clabber :
Nor are we studious to inquire,
Who votes for manors, who for hire:
Our care is to improve the mind
With what concerns all human kind;
The various scenes of mortal life,
Who beats her husband, who his wife ;
Or how the bully at a stroke
Knock'd down the boy, the lantern broke,
One tells the rise of cheese and oat-meal ;
Another when he hot meal

;
One gives advice in proverbs old,
Instructs us how to tame a fcold;
Or how by almanacks 'tis clear,
That herrings will be cheap this year.

T. Dear Mullinix, I now lament
My precious time so long mis-spent,
By nature meant for nobler ends :
O introduce me to your friends!
For whom by birth I was design'd,
Till politics debas'd my mind :
I give myself entire to you ;
G-d the Whigs, and Tories too.

255

got a

260

365

270

* EPI

* EPITAPH

OF

BY-WORDS.

HE

ERE lies a round woman, who thought mighty odd,
Ev'ry word she e'er heard in this church about

God.
To convince her of God the good Dean did endeavour;
But still in her heart she held nature more clever.
Tho'he talk'd much of virtue, her head always run 5
Upon something or other she found better fun:
For the dame, by her kill in affairs astronomical,
Imagin'd, to live in the clouds was but comical.
In this world she despis'd ev'ry soul she met here ;
And now she's in t'other, she thinks it but

queer.

10

EPIGRAM, on seeing a worthy prelate go out

of church in the time of divine service to wait on his Grace the D. of D

ORD Pam in the church (could you think it ?)

kneel'd down; When told the Lieutenant was just come to town, His flation defpifing, unaw'd by the place, He Aies from his God to attend on his Grace: To the ccurt it was fitter to pay his devotion, 5 Since God had no hand in his Lordship's promotion.

EPIGRAM from the French.

SłR, I admit your gen’ral rule, ,

That ev'ry poet is a fool :
But you yourself may serve to show it,

That ev'ry fool is not a poet.

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htte of age and INFIRMITIES,
Anyrning PRODIGALITY and HYPOCRISY : ,
He matchless IMPUDENCE from the second.
In the undeviating pravity of his manners,
For, withour TRADE OF PROFESSION,

Without TRUST of PUBLIC MONEY,
| FR. CHARTRES was a man infamous for all manner of vices.
regiment for a cheat; he was next banished Brussels, and drum-

med out of Ghent, on the same account. After a hundred tricks
31% A DIALOGUE BETWEP
Some have the city in their care,

„CHARTRES *.
From noxious steams to purge
Some teach us in these dan
How to walk upright in deth to rot
Some whose reformin CIS CHARTRES;
To lafh the lewdne LEXIBLE CONSTANCY,
Some for the pul

CHE UNIFORMITY of life,
Perpetual envi PERSISTED,
Whose able
of twenty

of EVERY HUMAN VICE;
We scor
Of pay
Nor :
Wb

Nor was he more fingular
W

Than successful

In accumulating weALTH:
And without BRIBE-WORTHY service,

or more properly created,

A MINISTERIAL ESTATE. when he was an enfign in the army, he was drummed out of the ar the gaming.tables, he took to lending of money at exorbitant intered, and on great penalties, accumulating premium, 'interest

, and capital into a new capital, and seizing to a minute when the payments became due. In a word, by a constant attention to the vices, wants, and follies of mankind, he acquired an immense fortunc. His house was a perpetual bawdyhouse. He was twice condemped for rapes, and pardoneda; but the last time not without imprisonment in Newgate, and large confiscations. He died in Scotland in 1731, aged 62. The populace at his funeral raised a great riot, almost tore the body out of the cofon, and cast dead dogs, &c. into the grave along with it. This epitaph contains his character, very justly drawn by Dr Arbuthnot-- This geneleman was worth seven tho: fand pounds a year estate in land, and about one hundred i boufanikio money.

He acquired,

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he only person of his time,

without the mask of HONESTY,
is primeval meanNESS
is'd of TEN THOUSAND a-year ;

daily deserved the Gibber for what he did, iast condemned to it for what he could not do.

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Oh indignant reader!
Think not his life useless to mankind !
PROVIDENCE conniv'd † at his execrable designs,

To give to after ages
A conspicuous Proof and EXAMPLE,
Of how small estimation is EXORBITANT WEALTH

In the fight of GOD,
By his bestowing it on the most unWORTHY of ALL

MORTALS.

cætera norunt

Joannes jacet hic Mirandula-
Et Tagus et Ganges for an et Antipodes.

Applied to Francis CHARTRES.
HERE Francis Chartres lits- be civil !

The reft God knows—perhaps the devil. .

* E P. I G R A M.
PETER complains that God has given

To his poor babe a life so short :
Consider, Peter, he's in heaven;

"Tis good to have a friend at court.

* A N

N O T Τ H E R.

YOU

U beat your pate, and fancy wit will come ;
Knock as you please, there's no body at home.

EPI. + See voli iv. p. 7.

* EPITAPH on FRANCIS CHARTRES .

Here continueth to rot

The body of FRANCIS CHARTRES;
Who, with an INFLEXIBLE CONSTANCY,
And INIMITABLE UNIFORMITY of life,

PERSISTED,
In spite of age and INFIRMITIES,
In the practice of EVERY HUMAN VICE;
Excepting PRODIGALITY and HYPOCRISY :
His insatiable AyaRICE exempted him from the first,

His matchless IMPUDENCE from the fecond.

Nor was he more singular
In the undeviating prauity of his manners,

Than successful

In accumulating WEALTH :
For, without TRADE OF PROFESSION,
Without TRUST of PUBLIC MONEY,
And without briBE-WORTHY service,
He acquired, or more properly created,

A MINISTERIAL ESTATE.

+ FR. CHARTRES was a man infamous for all manner of vices. When he was an ensign in the army, he was drummed out of the regiment for a cheat; he was next banished Brussels, and drummed out of Ghent, on the same account. After a hundred tricks at the gaming-tables, he took to lending of money at exorbitant intered, and on great penalties, accumulating premium, 'interest

, and capital into a new capital, and seizing to a minute when the payments became due. In a word, by a constant attention to the vices, wants, and follies of mankind, he acquired an immense fortune. His house was a perpetual bawdyhouse. He was twice condemned for rapes, and pardonedo; but the last time not without imprisonment in Newgate, and large confiscations. He died in Scotland in 1731, aged 62. The populace at his funeral raised a great riot, almost tore the body out of the cofon, and cast dead dogs, &c. into the grave along with it. This epitaph contains his character, very justly drawn by Dr Arbuthnottleman was worth seven thousand pounds a year estate in land, and about one hundred i boufand is money. Pope.

This gen,

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