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In Lime Street, on the south side of Leadenhall Street, stood the mansion and chapel of the accomplished Sir Simon de Burley, formerly in the possession of Lord Neville. Lime Street is said to take its name from lime having been made or sold here. In this street the first penny post office was established in the reign of Charles the Second.

CHAPTER VIII.

CORNHILL, SAINT MICHAEL'S CHURCH, ROYAL EX

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Cornhill Frequented by Old Clothes Sellers Pope's Head”

First London Coffee house — Tea-drinking — St. Michael's Church — The Standard in Cornhill — The Royal Exchange – The Pawn - Royal Exchange Bazaar Change Alley — Threadneedle Street -- Gordon Riots - Merchant Taylors' Company – Southsea House — Drapers' Company - Plague in Lothbury.

LEADENHALL STREET leads us into Cornhill, which derives its name from its having been from time immemorial the principal corn-market in London. In the reign of Elizabeth, Cornhill appears to have been principally frequented by the vendors of worn-out apparel, who, according to Stow, were not among the most honest classes of the community. “I have read of a countryman,' " he writes, “that, having lost his hood in Westminster Hall, found the same in Cornhill, hanged out to be sold, which he challenged, but was forced to buy or go without it.”

In Cornhill stood a large building called the Pope's Head, said to be one of the most ancient

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