Mental Dynamics; Or, Groundwork of a Professional Education: The Hunterian Oration Before the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 15th February, 1847

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W. Pickering, 1847 - 65 páginas
 

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Página 34 - Hence in a season of calm weather Though inland far we be, Our Souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither, Can in a moment travel thither, And see the Children sport upon the shore, And hear the mighty waters rolling evermore.
Página 34 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing...
Página 65 - ... the sages and professors of the law and jurisprudence, of medicine and physiology, of music, of military and civil architecture, of the physical sciences, with the mathematical as the common organ of the preceding ; in short, all the so-called liberal arts and sciences, the possession and application of which constitute the civilization of a country, as well as the theological.
Página 31 - twixt south and south-west side; On either which he would dispute, Confute, change hands, and still confute. He'd undertake to prove, by force Of argument, a man's no horse; He'd prove a buzzard is no fowl, And that a lord may be an owl, A calf an alderman, a goose a justice, And rooks committee-men and trustees.
Página 31 - ... rules must be especially worthy the attention, not of the members of this or that profession merely, but of every one who is desirous of possessing a cultivated mind. To understand the theory of that which is the appropriate intellectual occupation of Man in general, and to learn to do that well, which every one will and must do, whether well or ill, may surely be considered as an essential part of a liberal education.
Página 65 - The clerisy of the nation, or national church in its primary acceptation and original intention, comprehended the learned of all denominations, the sages and professors of the law and jurisprudence, of medicine and physiology, of music, of military and civil architecture, with the mathematical as the common organ of the preceding; in short, all the so-called liberal arts and sciences, the possession and application of which constitute the civilization of a country, as well as the theological.
Página 65 - ... liberal arts and sciences, the possession and application of which constitute the civilization of a country, as well as the theological. The last was, indeed, placed at the head of all; and of good right did it claim the precedence. But why? Because under the name of theology or divinity were contained the interpretation of languages, the conservation and tradition of past events, the momentous epochs and revolutions of the race and nation, the continuation of the records, logic, ethics, and...
Página 13 - Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has soothed my afflictions ; it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments ; it has endeared solitude, and it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and the beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.
Página 29 - Without condition. Such the rise of forms Sequester'd far from sense and every spot Peculiar in the realms of space or time; Such is the throne which man for Truth amid The paths of mutability hath built Secure, unshaken, still; and whence he views, In matter's mouldering structures, the pure forms Of triangle or circle, cube or cone, Impassive all; whose attributes nor force Nor fate can alter.
Página 42 - ... in short, to form that sentiment of honour and gentlemanly feeling, in which the moral life of the individual breathes as in its natural atmosphere, with an unconsciousness, which gives the charm of unaffected manners and conduct.

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