The Panama Canal: Report of the Hon. John Bigelow, Delegated by the Chamber of Commerce of New York to Assist at the Inspection of the Panama Canal in February, 1886, Band 1

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Press of the Chamber of Commerce, 1886 - 30 Seiten
 

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Seite 20 - After five days' heroic struggle, the workers were defeated. And then followed a blood-bath of the defenceless prisoners, the like of which has not been seen since the days of the civil wars which ushered in the downfall of the Roman republic.
Seite 20 - ... Veraguas, and the River Chiriqui (Calobebora) inclusive; and on the Pacific side, as far as the River Chiriqui Viejo, inclusive, to the East of Point Burica. "The territorial limit which the United States of Colombia claims reaches, on the Atlantic side, as far as Cape Gracias a Dios, inclusive ; and on the Pacific side, as far as the mouth of the River Golfito and in Gulf Dulce.
Seite 8 - Such canal shall be of sufficient capacity and depth as shall afford convenient passage for vessels of the largest tonnage and greatest draft now in use, and such as may be reasonably anticipated...
Seite 5 - It establishes a permanent regime of neutrality "in order that both in time of peace and in time of war [the Canal] shall remain secure and open to peaceful transit by the vessels of all nations on terms of entire equality...
Seite 22 - ... per eight-hour day ; more when working overtime. He is charged 40 cents per diem for his three meals, served in the European mess, which leaves $1.20 as a minimum net wage per diem, or a little less than 30*. per week, but many earn more. The Spaniard shows no sign of settling upon the Zone. Sometimes he goes on to railway work in Brazil, more often he returns home with his savings. Skilled Labour on the Isthmus. The skilled labour on the Isthmus has, from the outset, been mainly done by white...
Seite 13 - ... feet below the sea ( — 40 feet) for the lower part of this core. Nor is this all that is to be done to check seepage beneath the earthen dam. From the bottom of the trench excavated for the puddled core, sheet-piling, made of 4-inch timbers, is to be driven down for another 40 feet, so that sheet-piling and puddled core together will form an impervious barrier to —80 feet; that is to say, 80 feet below the surface-level of the sea, or about 85 feet below the lowest natural surface of the...
Seite 1 - It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honoured dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they...

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