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of money in England: but in whose hands? Those who have had the management of such prodigious sums as have been given these last three and twenty years, on pretence of carrying on the war. Inquire what sums the late lord treasurer * left the exchequer, and what immense debts in the navy and elsewhere : how the funds were all anticipated or loaded. Observe but what industry has been used, that the late party should part with none of their vast wealth to assist the present exigency; and then let us wonder at the wisdom and conduct of that ministry, which has been able to wade through all these difficulties, restore credit, and uphold the armies abroad: and can we doubt, after this, of their entering into the true interests of the nation, or dispute the peace they shall think fit to advise the queen to make? How can our malicious author say, “ That it will be a severe mortification for so great

and successful a general, to see the fruits of his

victories thrown all away at once, by a shameful $6 and scandalous peace; after a war of nine years, “ carried on with continued successes, greater than

have been known in story? And how grievous « must it be to him, to have no footstep remain, s except the building at Woodstock, of all the great « advantages which he has obtained for the queen “ and the British nation, against their dangerous " enemy; and consequently of his own extraordi“ nary merit to her majesty and his country?" No!.. are they about to take the garter from him? to unprince, unduke him? to confiscate all his large possessions, except Woodstock ? those vast sums in the

* Lord Godolphin,

VOL. XVIII.

banks

banks of Venice, Genoa, and Amsterdam * ? his stately movables, valuable paintings, costly jewels, and, in a word, those immense riches of which himself and his lady (as good an accomptant as she is) do not yet know the extent of ? Are all these, I say, to be resumed, and nothing remaining but that edi. fice or memento of a subject's ambition, the stately walls of Blenheim, built while his gracious benefactress is contented to take up her residence in an old patched up palace, during the burden of a heavy war, without once desiring to rebuild Whitehall, till by the blessing of peace her subjects shall be capacitated to undergo the necessary taxes? I am ashamed to enumerate those obligations the duke has to his queen and country, while he has such wretched and ungrateful advocates, who bellow his uneasiness, and exaggerate his mortifications. It is the misfortune of the times, that we cannot explain to our own people the occasion we have for a peace, without letting our enemies into our necessities, by which they may rise in their demands. Could there be a poll made, and voices collected from house to house, we should quickly see how unanimous our people are for a peace; those excepted, who either gain by the war, or, concealing their hoards, pay but small proportions toward it; an art well known and practised in this great city, where a person worth many thousands shall get himself rated at but one, two, or

* Beside the precarious security of the two former of these banks, they gave but 3 per cent interest at that time ; when 8, 9, or 10 per cent was common in England. This proves either that the duke was not so good a “ husband of his money,” as he is above supposed to be; or that he was desirous of securing a fund abroad, in case of an emergency,

three three hundred pounds stock; while the poor landed man is forced to pay to the extent, because his estate is known, and accordingly valued.

To conclude: I think, in the hands we are in, we need not dispute our safety; and if, as this author would insinuate, even a separate peace should be intended by some of our allies, after the example of our wise neighbours the Dutch at the treaty of Nimeguen, the generality of the people will be easily brought to agree that it is better than no peace at all. They know that our ministry are so well acquainted with the true interest of the nation, and are so tender of its welfare, 'that they will not consent to take one step in this affair, but what makes for the glory of the queen, and the happiness of her subjects.

A TRUE

RELATION

OF THE SEVERAL

FACTS AND CIRCUMSTANCES

OF THE INTENDED

RIOT AND TUMULT

ON

QUEEN ELIZABETH'S BIRTHDAY:

GATHERED FROM AUTHENTICK ACCOUNTS;

AND PUBLISHED

FOR THE INFORMATION OF ALL TRUE LOVERS OF OUR

CONSTITUTION IN CHURCH AND STATE,

FIRST PRINTED IN NOV. 1711.

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