Poetry and Music in Seventeenth-Century England

Capa
Cambridge University Press, 11 de dez. de 1997 - 311 páginas
This study explores the relationship between the poetic language of Donne, Herbert, Milton and other British poets, and the choral music and part-songs of composers including Tallis, Byrd, Gibbons, Weelkes and Tomkins. The seventeenth century was the time in English literary history when music was most consciously linked to words, and when the mingling of Renaissance and 'new' philosophy opened new discovery routes for the interpretation of art. McColley offers close readings of poems and the musical settings of analogous texts, and discusses the philosophy, performance, and disputed political and ecclesiastical implications of polyphony. She also enters into the discourse about the nature of language, relating poets' use of language and composers' use of music to larger questions concerning the arts, politics and theology.
 

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Conteúdo

concent of words and music
11
The concinnity of the arts and the church music
53
Donnes temporal
94
The choir in Herberts temple
134
voices in Miltons choirs
175
the praise of music
218
Music poems and iconography for
238
Chronology
244
Notes
256
Discography
275
Bibliography
281
Index
300
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