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difficulties that surrounded you, in the city of by the agent there. You will take a receipt Albany, where he could remain quite free from for the money there paid. The remainder of any danger, and when through the instrument. the annuity, being two thousand five hundred ality of friends he received the appointment of dollars, you will distribute equally among the captain of a company of militia, and was called Pottawatomies at Monroe. You will first, from upon to lead this company to New York, to the best information you can procure, make an assist in the defense of our sea-board, where estimate of the numbers at the different villages was General Williams then? Why,indisposed; and bands who will probably attend for the yes, fellow-citizens, indisposed, and his lieuten- purpose of receiving a share of the money. As ant bravely led on the company to the defense. these bands arrive you will collect all the indi

Who was it that in 1814 vilified and derided viduals together, and divide among them your reverend prelate, Gabriel Richard, and equally and fairly the amount allotted to the sowed the seeds of discord in your church, and band. The payments will be made by one of published a handbill in French and Eng- you and to no other person but an Indian. lish, containing the vilest of slanders? We The only distinction you will make in the divisask you, was it not the same General Williams? ion will be in favor of a few of the old and in

Fellow-citizens, we will not longer weary fluential chiefs. To these you may allow a you by the recital of the facts respecting these larger sum, not, however, exceeding forty or men, that would make a patriot blush. These fifty dollars. are the men that are held up before you as I am desirous that the Indians should reRepublicans, who have rendered services to the main as little time as possible at the River country, and are, therefore, entitled to your Raisin. You will therefore use your exertions support and favors. Is it so? We anticipate to pay them, and persuade them to return as your answer. To the polls then, fellow-citizens, soon as you can. and show by your votes for Austin E. Wing, Some claims against the Pottawatomies will the people's candidate, that you are Republi- . be herewith handed you, and should there cans in deed and in fact. That you love your be any others tendered you, you will recountry and your country's friends, and that ceive and examine them. If you are satisfied you are governed by nobler principles than of their justice you will make a demand upon the shackles of party could prescribe. Give the Indians for the amount and endeavor to your votes to that man who will serve you persuade them to pay it. Whatever you may best; and if you do, we are satisfied they will receive you will pay to the parties interested. be given for Austin E. Wing.

And you will report to me as well those claims

which are allowed and paid, as those which are Similar meeting were held in Oakland county,

rejected. You will take regular receipts for all Hamtramck, River Rouge.

your payments.

The annuities due to the Ottawa Indians INSTRUCTIONS.

amount to five thousand three hundred dollars. DETROIT, July 31, 1824. Of this sum three thousand six hundred dollars GENTLEMEN: The annuities payable by law are payable and have been paid at the Miami to the Pottawatomie Indians amount to ten by Mr. Stickney. Six hundred and fifty dollars thousand seven hundred dollars. Of this sum of the residue have been paid here to the band six thousand five hundred dollars have been of Cocoche or the negroes. The remainder, sent to Chicago, and the residue, being four amounting to one thousand and fifty dollars, thousand two hundred dollars, is committed to you will pay to the Kekalimazoo and Washteyour charge to be transported to the River naw Ottawas. You will pursue the same proRaisin. Seventeen hundred dollars of this cess both in apportionment and in all other amount are destined for the Wabash and Elk- respects as I have before provided for the payhart Pottawatomies and will be paid at Fortment of the Pottawatomies. I enclose a stateWayne. You will please deliver it to Messrs. ment of Mr. Stickney respecting a claim against R. A. and T. Forsyth, who will be at Monroe the Washtenaw Ottawas, which you will ex. on Wednesday or Thursday next, and who will amine and decide. transport it to Fort Wayne, to be distributed The Ottawa chief, Keewaakwishkum, has

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been a faithful friend of the United States, and peace. He leaves a wife, a daughter, Ming through his exertions principally the Ottawa Lucy, and two sons, Fred and Frank, to mourn cession at the treaty of Chicago was made. I his loss. The funeral took place from the wish he may be particularly remembered. family residence on Tilden street, Las Vegas,

Your compensation will be two dollars per March 20, 1888, the services being conducted day, and the expenses of the two gentlemen by Rev. James Frazer, and a large concourse who leave here upon the business will be borne of friends were in attendance. by the United States. Very respectfully, gentlemen, I am, your ob't serv't,

HARVEY AUSTIN JAMES CONNER,

LEW Cass.

Was born in Skaneateles, Onondaga county, EBENEZER REED, GABRIEL GODFROY,

New York, January 9, 1803. In 1824 he came

to Michigan Territory and located at Ann CHARLES NOBLE, Esquires.

Arbor, where he engaged in the manufacture of leather. In 1832 he removed to Brooklyn, Jackson county, where he engaged in agri

culture. His second son, who still survives HARVEY STONE

him, was the first male child born in the Was born in Onondaga county, near Syracuse,

present town of Brooklyn. He was postFebruary 19, 1815. At the age of seven years

master, justice of the peace, and elder in the he, rith his father and mother, their little

Presbyterian church, in which last relation he family, and several relatives, emigrated to

was very bighly esteemed. He removed to Monroe, Michigan, making nearly the entire

Monroe and died at his farm in the town of Mon

roe on the south side of the River Raisin, Febdistance with ox teams. They found but few

ruary 4, 1866. He had three sons, all of whom white settlers among the mixed French and Indians at that place, and Mr. Stone was about

enlisted in the War of the Rebellion. The

youngest was killed at Malvern Hill, Virginia. the last of those early pioneers, the others

The second son, Henry R. Austin, is the only having dropped by the wayside as the years passed on. He saw the town grow from an

survivor, who is now and has for years been Indian trading post to the present beautiful

eagaged in the United States mail service, and

highly esteemed as an elder in the First Preslittle city of which every Monroeite is so justly proud, and was always pleased to tell of the byterian church of Monroe. changes which he had seen take place. He lived on the farm which his father settled for

ALFRED G. BATES. sixty-two years, selling it in 1884, and removing his family to the city. He was gentle Among our early pioneers no one was better and unassuming in his manners, of a retiring or more favorably known than Alfred G. disposition, but thoroughly beloved by all who Bates. For years at his farm on the Raisin, knew him. One rarely meets with such an up- and later in the city itself, he was thoroughly right character as was his, or one in whom identified with the settlement and growth of everybody so completely trusted. His kindly Monroe and Monroe county. Alfred was the disposition was best known in his own home, son of Phineas P. Bates, of Canandaigua, New where he was revered and loved. He, with his York. Phineas P. Bates was the son of Phineas wife, remored to Las Vegas in the fall, to visit Bates, who purchased in 1790 what is now their children, who had all settled in that known in Canandaigua as “Brookside" or city. He had been in good health until April, « The Bates farm," and moved his family there 1888, when nervous prostration or general de in February, 1791, traveling from Connecticut bility laid hold upon bim, terminating in his with a sled drawn by oxen. His was the death. All that human skill could devise or seventh family settling in Canandaigua, at loving kindness suggest was done to keep the that time the western limit of the settlements dear father, but it was not to be. He ex- in the State of New York; in fact there were pressed himself as ready to go, and wanted few settlers west of Schenectady.

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Phineas Bates had four sons : Stephen, born robber bands in the Black Forest of Germany. in Granville, Massachusetts; Asher, born in Mr. Bates's intelligence, coolness and dauntless Hartland, Connecticut; Phineas P., born in courage especially fitted him for the dangerous Hartland, Connecticut; and David C., born in work of suppressing these outlaws, and the Canandaigua, New York. These sons all took records of the State's prison bear the names of active parts in the early settlement of western many desperate characters that he succeeded New York, and were noted for their inde- in placing behind its bars. At different times pendence of character and sterling integrity. Mr. Bates filled other local positions of more or

Phineas P. Bates had three sons: Alfred G., less prominence, serving one terın in the legisGeorge C., and John S. Alfred and George lature; but he was a modest, retiring gentle. removed to Michigan, where they settled; man, devoting most of his life to his private Alfred in Monroe as a farmer in 1834, and business, and interesting himself in the affairs George C. in Detroit as a lawyer a year or two of others only as his sympathies were enlisted later. John S., well known by the older citi- by his neighbors and friends, among whom zens of Monroe, remained at the homestead in he was held in the highest possible esteem. Canandaigua and died there in 1855. George A sketch of the life of an ordinary indi. C., for many years one of the prominent law- vidual, like the history of a peaceful commuyers of Michigan, subsequently went to Cali- nity, requires but little space. Yet it is in the fornia, living at different times in California, homes of these modest American gentlemen, Utah (where he was United States District and in these quiet religious communities, that Attorney), and Colorado, where he died in are planted and cultivated those principles of 1885. Alfred remained a citizen of Monroe patriotism and unselfish consideration for the county until his death, in 1881.

rights of others, that distinguish Americans This little sketch of the family of Alfred from the citizens of other nationalities, and Bates will give to any one familiar with New make the educated Americans the peers of the England and New England traditions an idea titled aristocrats of the world. Mr. Bates as of the character of the man. He was purely an individual, and Monroe as a community, of the New England type, liberalized in trans are but fair types of other individuals and planting to western soil.- Generous by nature, communities of similar origin. In them we his sympathy for his fellows was strongly de- see the development under most favorable veloped by the struggles consequent upon the auspices of the character of the Puritan, enearly settlement of the country, and he was larged, broadened and softened of many of its known as one of the most unselfish and kind- asperities by suffering, by struggle and success. hearted of that splendid band of men who The devotion to duty is still there, the capacity settled in Monroe at about the same time he for self-sacrifice daily illustrated, while charity did. Monroe was then a New England colony, for the weakness of others, without which no supplanting the original French settlers; a character can be lovely, becomes a mantle so colony composed of men of such intelligence large that with it they are enabled to envelop and strength of character that in the early the whole human race. days of the State it was known as “the Inde- Toone who has known the subject of this little pendent State of Monroe.” Two years after sketch, and known his neighbors and friends in his arrival he was elected sheriff of the county, Monroe county, it seems a pity that those coming and was subsequently appointed deputy United after us must, of necessity, have so little appreStates marshal for the district of Michigan. ciation of the real strength and nobleness of While occupying these positions he took a very their characters. Their lives were passed in prominent part in breaking up some of the such quiet and unostentatious ways that withwonderfully organized bands of counterfeiters out a personal knowledge of the trials and and borse thieves, whose operations extended difficulties surrounding them it is impossible to

of the exploits of these bold marauders in the descendants and successors who find the forests great wilderness through which they operated cleared away, the marshes drained, and the seems like the tales that are told of the roman- country converted from a dense wilderness to a tic characters of the Spanish Main, and of the beautiful park; log school-bouses replaced by

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