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and Mr. Cecire will sign it also as witness un according to the law to vote for a representader the words in presence of. But you will sign tive in the general assembly of this Territery, yours opposite that of Mr. Cecire.

that an election for a representative for the All this is formality, but it is necessary in county of Wayne in the general assembly of order to preserve to Sanscrainte a large prop. this Territory, in virtue of writ of election, erty that the savages have, to my knowledge, which has been addressed to me by his Excelgiven since to different persons. I know you lency, the Governor of the Territory, to this too friendly to justice to doubt a moment that effect, will open and hold in Detroit, for the said you would render justice to Sanscrainte, who county, in the house where the court sits, Monappears to me to merit it.

day, the 17th of December next, in which elecI have the bonor to be, very perfectly, your tion will be open from 10 o'clock and will convery humble serrant, PETER AUDRIAN. tinue by regular adjournments until 4 o'clock

As Mr. Sanscrainte is going to the Fort at in the afternoon of the 19th day of the same Detroit City for his business, I advise you to

month of December, at which hour the said send me by him the title of your land, in order election will be closed according to law. In that I may register it immediately. This is a consequence of, by these presents, all the informality absolutely necessary in order to bave

habitants qualified, thus included, are sumthe confirmation of the title and the continua moned and required to be on hand at the time tion. Give the same advice to your brothers. and place thus designated, in order to give

PETER. their voice for the person whom they deem

proper for a representative in the general asWe, belonging to the chiefs of the Pottawat- sembly, in conformity with said warrant of omie Nation, on Raisin River, declare and election, etc. .

LEWIS BOND, assert the following:

Sheriff County Wayne. That the lands situate between Stony Creek and Sandy Creek and bordering on Lake Erie, said lands measuring to the depth of one

DETROIT, May 14, 1798. hundred acres, have been given long ago by

Sir: I am ordered by the court to require the elders and principal chiefs of our Nation to you to inform the inhabitants of your district Francis Pepin.

that those of them who are summoned for the That the whole Nation being familiar with petit jury of the next court, will be excused this fact. will protect him in the possession (if they so desiro) by paying $2.00 for a subthereof. In consequence we entreat our stitute

stitute; that is to say, that each person who American brothers to leave said Pepin in prefers to rest or attend to his own business peaceable ownership.

rather than serve on jury, can leave it entirely We also declare that Mr. Portier Renais, who to his own option. I have the honor of being, bas a contract for a large tract of land, said respectfully, your very humble servant, contract having been made by himself alone,

PETER AUDRIAN, and as soon as he tried to appropriate these

Clerk. lands to himself, the chiefs, then still living, have said publicly and openly that these lands

DETROIT, May 22d, 1798. were never given to him, and that they have

him and that ther have Sir: I have the honor of announcing to enjoined their successors to oppose themselves you that the Judges of the Supreme Court, to it, and to which they hereby adhere and whom you have seen at your house, will hold, bave this protest by their names.

in Detroit, a Circuit Court next Tuesday, 29th (Signed by the Chiefs.) of May. It is your duty to be there, also your Done at River Raisin, 10th May, 1797. associate, Mr. Jobin, with the constable of

your district. It is very important that Sun

day next you should have announced at the Advice to the public:

church door that all persons summoned upon DETROIT, 26th November, 1798. grand or petit jury for this Circuit Court, must By these presents, advice is given to the in. be here Tuesday before 11 o'clock in the mornhabitants of Wayne county who are qualified ing, because they will be fined heavily if ab.

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sent. By doing so you will render service to I beg you will give immediate attention, and many people who might fail to be present on make them public to the captains in your bat. account of not being instructed to do so. I talion, in order that they will furnish you with have the honor of being, respectfully, your very the return of their forces and ammunition withhumble servant, PETER AUDRIAN, Clerk out delay. I beg you to send the report the

PS_You will say if you please to Mr soonest possible. I have the honor of being Isadore Navarre that I will take for money ten

your very humble servant,

G. GODFROY, hundred weight of flour, good and marketable at $4.00 a hundred, provided that it is delivered

Lieut. Col. Com. 1st Reg. of M., T. M. here.

P. S.--I pray you present my compliments

to Captain Lacroix and urge him to aid you to OFFICE OF THE COMMISSARY GENERAL OF THE )

PRISONERS. July 28. 1814. ŕ make the returns required on the other side, A convention having been definitely resolved

because the governor expects the reports imon the 16th of July, at Champlain, in the State

mediately, and see that you neglect nothing, of New York, between the agents duly author

fearing the consequences. G. GODFROY. ized on the part of the United States Government and that of Great Britain, by which all prisoners of war and all other prisoners, subjects or residents of one, or citizens or residents In OFFICE OF ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE MILITIA )

OF TERRITORY OF MICHIGAN, GENERAL HEAD. } of the other, captured by the commandant in

QUARTERS, DETROIT, August 25, 1814. authority, Sir George Provost, or by the forces

The commissary general of the prisoners under his orders during the present war, before having declared that a convention has been the 15th day of April past, which were paroled concluded between the Governments of the or otherwise left for their respective countries United States and Great Britain, by which all before said day, or who were kept by the persons, however taken, by either side since authority of the United States, or Canada or the declaration of war, and before the 15th day Nova Scotia, by the authority of Great Britain, of April last, were exchanged without excep. were exchanged without exception.

tion, the commander-in-chief is gratified to All officers and non-commissioned officers, be able to announce to the militia the glad soldiers and sailors, belonging to the forces by tidings. They are at present as free to serve as land or sea of the United States, regulars or if never taken prisoners. This situation remilitia, and all persons of all other description,

on, quires imperiously that the entire corps of who have been captured before the said 15th

re the said Toth militia are placed in the most efficacious state of April, by any of the military forces under for immediate service. said commander, and who were then in the

The Adjutant-General will announce the apUnited States under parole or otherwise, or pointments and promotions of officers which who are to be released in conformity with said have taken place. convention, are declared finally exchanged; The Second Regiment of Infantry will be and all such officers, non-commissioned officers, consolidated with and form a part of First soldiers, sailors and other persons, are by these Regiment, but remain a distinct battalion. presents notified that they are at liberty to The Lieutenant-Colonel Navarro will retain serve in any capacity as if they had never been his rank and command, but will make bis reprisoners. (Signed) T. Mason,

port direct to Lieutenant-Colonel Godfroy. Commissary General of the Prisoners.

Lieutenant-Colonel Godfroy and LieutenantTranslated by order of General Cass.

Colonel Smyth will make their reports (the G. McDOUGALL,

soonest possible to the Adjutant-General) of the Adjutant-General T. M.

forces and situation of their respective com

mands. DETROIT, August 25, 1814. By order of his Excellency, the CommanderTo Mr. Colonel Navarre :

in-Chief. Sir: I have the honor of transmitting to

GEO. McDOUGALL, you the original orders above mentioned, which

Adjutant-General T. M.

Copy of General Proctor's order:

He loved his church and country, and for To Thomas Caldwell, River Raisin, Mich.:

his Christian and civil virtues and sacrifices on Mr. Thomas Caldwell, or any other person the battle field, his memory deserves grateful acting under him, is hereby authorized and remembrance. directed to impress for his Majesty's service in At the close of the war he returned to his the Territory of Michigan, twelve horses and home to find none of its former comforts, but ineight yoke or pairs of oxen, with their yokes stead desolation and devastation. Courageous and chains, and such other articles as may be in his declining years, he gathered around him requisite to work the said horses and oxen. the semblance of what had been the ambition Dated at Detroit this 16th day of April, 1813. of his early years, “ A Home," the hospitality (Signed) HENRY PROCTOR, of which was proverbial.

Brig. Gen'l Commanding.

In perusing the correspondence and files of

JOHN ANDERSON Colonel Francis Navarre, I am impressed with Was born in Scotland, and emigrated to Canthe belief that he was a very devout and ex- ada when a boy. From Montreal he came to emplary member of the Catholic church, and Michigan to trade with the Indians. He estabthat no man outside of the priesthood has con- lished himself upon the River Raisin in the

ing the foundation thereof in the North west. affairs until the War of 1812. His residence His patriotism, energy and worth were appreci. and store were on the site on the north side of ated and held in high esteem by the territorial the river where T. E. Wing now resides. Durgovernors and officers of the American forces, ing the war he was captured by the British as it is evident the greater part of orders and and Indians, but soon escaped and fled to Day. correspondence from them to the River Raisin ton, Ohio, where he remained until peace was settlement before and during the war were restored. On returning to Monroe he found addressed to him. His power and influence his property had not escaped the ravages of were well known by officers of the British Gov- war, for his house and store were burned ernment, and for years a standing offer of a to the ground and his goods confiscated; but reward of $500 was proclaimed for bis capture his energy and perseverance soon restored in or scalp. He was hunted as a spy; was twice part what he had lost. His influence among taken prisoner by the British, but escaped. The the early settlers and Indians did much to last escape savored of the miraculous, for he was mitigate their hardships. He found homes for captured by a British officer and delivered into those left orphans and unprotected by the war, the hands of infuriated and brutal Indians, and and sought at Washington a redress for their tied to a stake prepared for burning, at Sand- wrongs. His thorough knowledge of the Inwich; but the barbarians to whom he was de- dian character rendered him efficient in restorlivered went out to welcome about 500 In ing peace among the various tribes of Michidians who were invited to the great sacrifice gan, and as he was fluent in eleven Indian and feast, and on their return found their vic- dialects, he was welcomed at all times by the tim gone. Their fury knew no bounds; torches Indians as an interpreter. He filled with credit were lighted, and their yells and whoops filled many local offices of honor and trust, and his the air. The colonel, knowing their manner of habitual kindness and ingenuousness carried hunting their victims, took advantage thereof him safely through many trying scenes in his by creeping into a hollow log a sbort distance career. He died at his home in Monroe in 1841, from where he had made his escape. They leaving two sons, John and Alexander, and a hunted for him for days, houses were burned, daughter, the wife of Judge Warner Wing, of feather-beds ripped open, and one day entered Monroe. a barn where he was concealed under the hay three feet under the surface. They thrust

COLONEL HUBERT LACROIX their bayonets through the bay, one just graz- Was a native of Montreal, of highly respectable ing his backbone. On leaving the barn they parentage. He came to the River Raisin in set fire thereto, but fortunately it did not burn.. the year 1800, where he lived to the time of his

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