The Life of Mary Russell Mitford ...: Related in a Selection from Her Letters to Her Friends, Volume 1

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Página 212 - the powers of a superior man, as they are blended, in his attractive character, with all the softness and simplicity of a child : no human being was ever more free from any taint of malignity, vanity, or falsehood.
Página 264 - Narrative Poems on the Female Character, in the Various Relations of Life,
Página 296 - With regard to novels, I should like to see one undertaken without any plot at all. I do not mean that it should have no story ; but I should like some writer of luxuriant fancy to begin with a certain set of characters — one family, for instance — without any preconceived design...
Página 294 - ... that ever existed, and that, till Pride and Prejudice showed what a precious gem was hidden in that unbending case, she was no more regarded in society than a poker or a fire-screen, or any other thin upright piece of wood or iron that fills its corner in peace and quietness. The case is very different now ; she is still a poker — but a poker of whom every one is afraid. It must be confessed that this silent observation from such an observer is rather formidable. Most writers are good-humoured...
Página 14 - ... there were few of the prettiest children of her age who won so much love and admiration from their friends, whether young or old, as little Mary Mitford.
Página 286 - ... a voice between grunting and croaking, a perpetual hoarseness which suffocates his words, and a vulgarity of manner which his admirers are pleased to call nature — the nature of Teniers it may be, but not that of Rafaelle. I am quite sure that in any character where he can possibly raise his voice above conversation pitch — where there is anything like strong writing that he can contrive to rant, or anything resembling passion for him to tear to rags — his acting will always be, if not...
Página 319 - Hawkins and Brompton ! • I am convinced that people read them for the story, to enjoy the stimulus of a novel without the name, just as some valetudinarians swallow drams from the apothecaries under the name of stomachics. Ah ! they had better take South, and Blair, and Seeker for guides, and go for amusement to Miss Edgeworth and Miss Austen. Bythe-way, how delightful is her " Emma !" — the best, I think, of all her charming works.
Página 137 - The saloon at the foot of the staircase represented a bower with a grotto, lined with a profusion of shrubs and flowers. The grand table extended the -whole length of the conservatory, and across Carlton House to the length of 200 feet.
Página 308 - Such notes as, warbled to the string, Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek, And made Hell grant what Love did seek; Or call up him that left half-told The story of Cambuscan bold...
Página 286 - Well, I went to see Mr. Kean, and was thoroughly disgusted. This monarch of the stage is a little insignificant man, slightly deformed, strongly ungraceful, seldom pleasing the eye, still seldomer satisfying the ear — with a voice between grunting and croaking, a perpetual hoarseness which suffocates his words, and a vulgarity of manner which his admirers are pleased to call nature — the nature of Teniers it may be, but not that of Rafaelle.

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