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What record of mere battles and sieges, wars and facts, could afford such fulness of knowledge, as to the real state of Greece, in all points which are most instructive, as we derive from the pamphlets (as they may be called) of Isocrates, from the dialogues of Plato, the moral and political treatises of Aristotle, and the various public and private orations of Isæus, Æschines, and Demosthenes ?

ARNOLD's History of Rome.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

-Second Speech

79

.104

.118

NOTES

Athenian money

Registration of citizens.

Property tax..

The waterglass..

Outline of the process in an action...

Guardian and ward...

Clubs

Questioning of the parties

Arbitration...

Challenges

Costs..

Damages

Disfranchisement

State debtors.....

Burdensome offices

Witnesses.....

Oaths.....

Marriage..

Execution

Mortgages...

124

130

135

144

146

154

158

163

169

175

182

185

192

197

206

222

247

263

271

279

I

PLAN OF THE WORK.

THE object of the present undertaking is twofold; first, to present in a legible form to the English reader certain speeches of Demosthenes, hitherto untranslated, and not so well known as they deserve to be ; secondly, to render some assistance to the student in the perusal of the author himself. For the former purpose I deemed it essential to translate

freely, and in an English style, so as to avoid archa

isms and harsh constructions. At the same time,
it has been my constant aim to represent the full
force and meaning of every passage in the original,
and I trust that, though not rendering word for
word, I still may be found a faithful interpreter.
The scholar will not look for that sort of assistance,
which consists in the solution of grammatical diffi-
culties, though perhaps he may occasionally find
me a useful guide in unravelling the author's mean-
ing, or following the course of the argument.
In the writings of Demosthenes there occur a
great variety of technical terms, connected with
matters of law and business, which it is desirable to
have correctly translated. To many indeed of these
there is nothing in our own language exactly similar
or corresponding; and the translator is often com-

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