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impolitick as it has been reprefented), and the mifchiefs it produced, were quite recent. Upon the principles therefore of the honourable gentleman, upon the principles of the minister himself, the minister has nothing at all to anfwer. He stands condemned by himself, and by all his affociates old and new, as a destroyer, in the first trust of finance, of the revenues : and in the first rank of honour, as a betrayer of the dignity of his country.

Most men, especially great men, do not always know their well-wishers. I come to rescue that noble lord out of the hands of those he calls his friends, and even out of his own. I will do him the justice he is denied at home. He has not been this wicked or imprudent man. He knew that a repeal had no tendency to produce the mischiefs. which give so much alarm to his honourable friend. His work was not bad in its principle, but imperfect in its execution; and the motion on your paper presses him only to compleat a proper plan, which, by, fome unfortunate and unaccountable errour, he had left unfinished.

I hope, fir, the honourable gentleman,who spoke last, is thoroughly satisfied, and satisfied out of the proceedings of ministry on their own favourite act, that his fears from a repeal, are groundless. If he is not, I leave him, and the noble lord who fits by. him, to settle the matter, as well as they can, together; for if the repeal of American taxes de

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repeal bad no tendency to produce the mischiefswhich give so much alarm to his honourable friend. His work was not bad in its principle, but imperfed in its execution; and the motion on your paper preffes him only to compleat a proper plan, which, by some unfortunate and unaccountable errour, he had left unfinished.

I hope, fir, the honourable gentleman who spoke lalt, is thoroughly satisfied, and satisfied out of the proceedings of ministry on their own favourite act, that his fears from a repeal are groundless. If he is not, I leave him, and the noble lord who fits by him, to settle the matter, as well as they can, together; for if the repeal of American taxes de

wards further defraying the expences of defending, protecting, and securing the laid dominions.

You have heard this pompous performance. Now where is the revenue which is to do all these mighty things ? Five fixths repealed—abandoned -funk-gone--loft for ever. Does the poor folitary tea duty support the purposes of this preamble? Is not the supply there stated as effectually abandoned as if the tea duty had perished in the general wreck? Here, Mr. Speaker, is a precious mockery-a preamble without an act—taxes granted in order to be repealed—and the reasons of the -grant still carefully.kept up! This is raising a re„venue in America ! This is preserving dignity in England ! If you repeal this tax in compliance with the motion, I readily admit that you lose this fair .preamble... Estimate your loss in it. The object of the act.is gone already; and all you fuffer is the purging the statute-book of the opprobrium of an empty; abfurd, and false recital..

It has been said again and again, that the five taxes were repealed on commercial principles. "It. is so said in the paper in-my hand *; a paper which I constantly carry about; which I have often used, and fall often use again. What is got by this

* * Lord Hillsborough's circular letter to the governours of the colonies concerning the repeal of some-of the duties laid in the 2ct of 1767,: . iii..... .... .. .. .

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wurdfurther defraying the expences of defending „Prviting, and securing the faid dominions.

You have heard this pompous performance. low where is the revenue which is to do all these Eughty things? Five fixthis repealed—abandoned

-tank-gone--loft for ever. Does the poor foLary tea duty support the purposes of this preduble: Is not the fupply there stated as effectually ai indoned as if the tea duty had perished in the

general wreck ? Here, Mr. Speaker, is a precious L aers-a preamble without an acttaxes granted in order to be repealedand the seasons of the giant ftul carefully. kept up! This is raising a revenue in America! This is preserving dignity in

paltry pretence of commercial principles I know not; for, if your government in America is deftroyed by the repeal of taxes, it is of no consequence upon what ideas the repeal is grounded. Repeal this tax too upon commercial principles if you please. These principles will serve as well now as they did formerly. But you know that, either your objection to a repeal from these supposed consequences has no validity, or that this pretence never could remove it. This commercial motive never was believed by any man, either in America, which this letter is meant to soothe, or in England, which it is meant to deceive. It was impossible it Thould. Because every man, in the least acquainted with the detail of commerce, must know, that feveral of the articles on which the tax was repealed, were fitter objects of duties than almost any other articles that could possibly be chosen; without comparison more fo, than the tea that was left taxed; as infinitely less liable to be eluded by contraband. The tax upon red and white lead was of this nature. You have, in this kingdom, an advantage in lead, that amounts to a monopoly. When you find yourself in this situation of advantage, you sometimes venture to tax even your own

export. You did fo, foon after the last war; ' when, upon this principle, you ventured to impose

a duty on coals. In all the articles of American contraband trade, who ever heard of the smug-.. Aą *

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England! If you repeal this tax in compliance with the motion, I readily adımit that you lose this fair .prcamble. Eftimate your loss in it. The object of the act.is gone already; and all you fuffer is the frying the statute-book of the opprobrium of an cilptabturd, and falle recital. . It has been said again and again, that the five taxes were repealed on commercial principles. It is 10 faid in the paper in my hand *; a paper which I contiantly carry about; which I have often used, and fall often use again. What is got by this

Lord Hillborouch's circular letter to the governours of the colonies concerning the repeal of some of the duties laid in the

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gling of red lead, and white lead? You might, therefore, well enough, without danger of contraband, and without injury to commerce (if this were the whole consideration) have taxed these commodities. The same may be faid of glass. Besides, fome of the things taxed were so trivial, that the loss of the objects themselves and their utter annihilation out of American commerce, would have been comparatively as nothing but is the article of tea such an object in the trade of England, as not to be felt, or felt but slightly, like white lead, and red lead, and painters colours? Tea is an object of far other importance. Tea is perhaps the most important object, taking it with its necessary connexions, of any in the mighty circle of our commerce. If commercial principles had been the true motives to the repeal, or had they been at all attended to, tea would have been the last article we thould have left taxed for a subject of controversy.

Sir, It is not a pleasant consideration ; but nothing in the world can read so awful and so instructive a leffon, as the conduct of ministry in this business, upon the mischief of not having large and liberal ideas in the management of great affairs. Never have the servants of the state looked at the whole of your complicated interests in one connected view. They have taken things, by bits and scraps, fome at one time and one pretence, and

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