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42. Temptation, ................ Lillo, ......110

43. Vanity of the World, ............F. Quarles, ...114

44. Legislative Instructions, .......... Webster, ....116

45. The Laborer, ............... Gallagher, ....117

46. Public Virtue, ...............H. Clay, ....118

47. The American Union, ..... ...... Webster, ....119

48. Love of God and of Man inseparable, ....L. Hunt, : ... 120

49. Extract from Speech in House of Representatives, R. C. Winthrop, . 121

60. Scene from the Honeymoon, ........ Tobin, ...... 123

51. Same subject, concluded, .......... .. .... 126

52. Treasures of the Deep, ........... Mrs. Hemans, . . 130

53. Stanzas on the Sea, ............ Bernard Barton, . 131

54. Power and Gentleness, ...........

. 131

55. Virtues of Washington, ...........Whipple, ... • 132

56. Military Character of Washington, . .....

• . . 134

57. Parental Ode to my Son, ..........T. Hond, .... 135

58. Power and Activity, ............ Combe, ..... 138

59. Hamlet and his Mother, ... ..... Shakspeare, ... 140

60. Satire on Pretended Philosophers and Projectors, Swift, . .::. . 144

61. Same subject, continued, .......... " ...... 148

os o concluded, .

. .. " ... .. 151

Golden Rules of David Conn

153

64. The Snow Flake..and Copperfield, ..... Dickens. : :

..H. F. Gould,. .. 155

65. Progress of Discovery during the last Half Cen-

tury, : ................. Scientific Am., . . 156

66. Same subject, continued, ..........

..157

67. 66

of concluded, ..........

. . 159

68. Marcelia, ..........

.. Procter, ..... 163

69. English Poetry,........

. . Chambers, . ... 164

70. Vulgar Hospitality, ....

....Swift, :.....165

71. The Thrush's Nest, ....

. . Clare, ......167

72. The Newcastle Apothecary, ..... .... Colman,..... 167

73. Thanatopsis, ................ Bryant, ..... 170

74. Euthanasia, ................W. G. Clark, ..172

75. Coronach, ................ Scott, ......173

.76. Parallel between Pope and Dryden, ..... Johnson, .... 174

77. English Versification, ........... Holmes, ... .-. 176

78. Compunction, ............... Churchill, ... .177

79. Beauties of Nature, ...........: Beattie, ::..177

80. To my Wife, ............... Lindley Murray, . 179

81. To a Wife, with a Ring, on the Anniversary of_.

her Wedding Day, ......

.... Bishop, :.... 180

82. Angling, .............

.... Armstrong, ...181

83. Retirement, ............

... Cotton, . . .

84. The Union, ... ... ... ..

ei,... Webster, ....183

85. Early Rising and Prayer, ... .... Vaughan, .... 135

86. The River Thames, ... ...... Denham, ...186

87. On the Sight of a great Library, . ...... Hall, ......

. . 187

88. Go, lovely Rose, ......

. . . . .1

89. On the Day of Judgment, ......... Roscommon, ... 188

90. The Hours, ................ Lewis, ... . 189

91. The American Union, ........... Tupper, .....190

92. Autumn Evening Scene, ... ...... Thomson, ...191

93. Love, Hope and Patience, in Education, . . . Coleridge, ....193

94. Home, .................. Montgomery, ..194

95. Nature, .................. Wordsworth,. . .195

96. Gradual Approaches of Age, ........ Crabbe, .....197

97. The Sabbath, ............... Grahame,.... 197

98. Gentleness of Manners with Firmness of Mind, Chesterfield, ... 199

99. Desire of the Happiness of Others, ..... Brown, .':... 201

.

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100. Causes of Weakness in Men's Understanding, . Locke, .....202

101. Matrimonial Happiness, .......... Lady Montague, .204

102. Scene from the Honeymoon, ........ Tobin, .... • 205

• 103. The Middle Age — Progress of Freedom,... Hume, .....206

104. The Opening of the Eyes of Mrs. Chick, ... Dickens, ... 209

105. Same subject, continued, ..........

...210

106. 1 .

concluded, ..........

...215

107. Ship driven out of its Course, ........ Falconer, ....219

108. Picture of Domestic Love, .... ..... Campbell, ..

109. Time, : ; :::::::::::

.... Young, .....

.. 221

110. Apostrophe to Night, ......

... 223

111. Wedded Love's First Home, ..

... 224

112. A Baronial Tower, ...:

• ... 224

113. The Deserted

· Perciv

.. 225

114. Red Jacket, ........

.... Halleck,..... 226

115. The Closing Year, .....

.... Prentice, .... 227

116. The Prairies, ......

.. Bryant,.....229

117. The Common Lot, ....

.... Montgomery, ...

118. The Fretful Man, ..... ..... Cowper, :....

119. The Winter Evening, ...

233

120. Moonlight Scene, ...... ..... Southey, ..... 236

121. Memory, . ... . . . .. . . ..... Rogers, .... 236

122. Destiny of our Country, ...... .. .. Winthrop, ....237

123. On Reading,............ ..... Gibbon, ..... 238

124. Changeable Character of Man, ....... Foster, .....

125. Results of Misdirected Ambition, ...... Adam Smith, .. 241

126. The Druses, ................Heber, ..... 242

127. The Wicked Man, .............R. H. Dana,: . . 243

128. The Prayer Answered, ........... Pollok, ..... 244

129. Public Weal consists of Individual Happiness, Webster, .... 246

130. Light Literature of the Present Age, ..... Chambers, . ... 247

131. Same subject, continued, ..........

.. 249

132. " o concluded, ............

.... 253

133. Boswell's Life of Johnson, ..

.... 255

134. Extract from Speech in U. S. Senate, .... Webster, ...,256

135. Liberty and Government, ............ Algernon Sidney,. 261

136. Midnight Scene in Rome-the Coliseum, . . Byron, ..... 262

137. Prospect of Planting Arts and Learning in

America,....

rica, ................ Bishop Berkeley, .264

138. A Parallel, ................ Eliz. F. Ellet, : .265

139. Curiosity, ..........

.... Sprague, . . . . . 265

140. E.xtract from Prometheus, ... ..... Percival, .... 266

141. Effect of Refinement, .... ..... Hume, ..... 267

142.. Progress of Sin, ........ .... Jeremy Taylor, . .270

143. The Rising and the Setting Sun, . ..... Gilpin,.... .271

144. Taste, .............

. . . .

... 273

145. To the West, ................ Gallagher, ....276

146. Erile of Erin, : ... .......... Campbell, . ... 279

147. Destruction of Sennacherib, ......... Byron, .....280

148. Extract from Speech in U. S. Senate, .... Webster, .... 280

149. Clarence and Brakenbury, ...:: .... Shakspeare, ... 284

150. Hamlet's Soliloquy on his Mother's Marriage,

. 286

151. Tribute to Shakspeare, ........... Jeffrey, .... . 287

152. Speech in U. S. Senate, ... ..... Clay,...... 287

153. Address on the Relation of the States to the

General Government, .......... Calhoun, .... 291

154. Extract from Speech in U. S. Senate, ..... Hayne, ..... 297

155. 16 " 6 16 16 16 16

..... Webster, .... 298

156. 56

1 o6.16 16 16

. .. . .

... 300

157. The Old Clock on the Stairs, ......:.· Longfellow, ...303

158. Extract from Speech in U.S. Senate, ..... Clay, ...... 305

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PARKER'S FOURTH READER.

LESSON I. An Address to Young Persons.—BLAIR. 1. I INTEND, in this address, to show you the importance of beginning early to give serious attention to your conduct. As soon as you are capable of reflection, you must perceive that there is a right and a wrong in human actions. You see that those who are born with the same advantages of fortune are not all equally prosperous, in the course of life. While some of them, by wise and steady conduct, attain distinction in the world, and pass their days with comfort and honor, others, of the same rank, by mean and vicious be. havior, forfeit the advantages of their birth, involve themselves in much misery, and end in being a disgrace to their friends, and a burden on society.

2. Early, then, may you learn, that it is not on the external condition in which you find yourselves placed, but on the part which you are to act, that your welfare or unhappiness, your honor or infamy, depends. Now, when beginning to act that part, what can be of greater moment than to regulate your plan of conduct with the most serious attention, before you have yet committed any fatal or irretrievable errors ?

3. If, instead of exerting reflection for this valuable purpose, you deliver yourselves up, at so critical a time, to sloth and pleasures; if you refuse to listen to any counselor but humor, or to attend to any pursuit except that of amusement; if you allow yourselves to float loose and careless on the tide of life, ready to receive any direction which the current of fashion may chance to give you, — what can you expect to follow from such beginnings ? • 4. While so many around you are undergoing the sad consequences of a like indiscretion, for what reason shall not those consequences extend to you? Shall you attain success without that preparation, and escape dangers without that precaution, which are required of others ? Shall happiness grow up

to you, of its own accord, and solicit your acceptance of it when, to the rest of mankind, it is the fruit of long cultivation, and the acquisition of labor and care ? · 5. Deceive not yourselves with those arrogant hopes. Whatever be your rank, Providence will not, for your sake, reverse its established order. The Author of your being hath enjoined you to take heed to your ways; to ponder the paths of your feet; to remember your Creator in the days of your youth.” He hath decreed, that, they only “who seek after wisdom shall find it; that fools shall be afflicted, because of their transgressions; and that whoever refuseth instruction shall destroy his own soul.”

6. By listening to these admonitions, and tempering the vivacity of youth with a proper mixture of serious thought, you may insure cheerfulness for the rest of life; but by delivering yourselves up, at present, to giddiness and levity, you lay the foundation of lasting heaviness of heart.

7. When you look forward to those plans of life which either your circumstances have suggested or your friends have proposed, you will not hesitate to acknowledge, that, in order to pursue them with advantage, some previous discipline is requisite. Be assured, that whatever is to be your profession, no education is more necessary to your success than the acquirement of virtuous dispositions and habits. This is the universal preparation for every character, and every station in life,

8. Bad as the world is, respect is always paid to virtue. In the usual course of human affairs, it will be found that a plain understanding, joined with acknowledged worth, contributes more to prosperity than the brightest parts without probity or honor. Whether science, or business, or public life, be your aim, virtue still enters, for a principal share, into all those great departments of society. It is connected with eminence, in every liberal art; with reputation, in every branch of fair and useful business; with distinction, in every public station.

9. The vigor which it gives the mind, and the weight which it adds to character; the generous sentiments which it breathes; the undaunted spirit which it inspires; the ardor of diligence which it quickens; the freedom which it procures, from pernicious and dishonorable avocations; are the foundations of all that is highly honorable or greatly successful among men.

10. Whatever ornamental or engaging endowments you

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