The Life of William A. Buckingham, the War Governor of Connecticut, with a Review of His Public Acts, and Especially the Distinguished Services He Rendered His Country During the War of the Rebellion: With which is Incorporated, a Condensed Account of the More Important Campaigns of the War, and Information from Private Sources and Family and Official Documents

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W.F. Adams Company, 1894 - 537 Seiten
 

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Seite 28 - A house divided against itself cannot stand." I believe this Government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved, I do not expect the house to fall, but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in the course of ultimate extinction; or its advocates will push...
Seite 106 - I shall have the most solemn one to " preserve, protect, and defend " it. I am loth to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break, our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Seite 266 - If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which having continued through His appointed m time, He now wills to remove and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense...
Seite 106 - In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you. You can have no conflict, without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in Heaven to destroy the government, while / shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect and defend
Seite 105 - I therefore consider that in view of the Constitution and the laws the Union is unbroken, and to the extent of my ability I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins upon me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all the States.
Seite 105 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so ; and I have no inclination to do so.
Seite 89 - All obstructions to the execution of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle and of fatal tendency.
Seite 388 - The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the army of Northern Virginia.
Seite 367 - I repeat the declaration made a year ago, that 'while I remain in my present position I shall not attempt to retract or modify the Emancipation Proclamation nor shall I return to slavery any person who is free by the terms of that proclamation, or by any of the acts of Congress.
Seite 343 - Not only does it afford the obvious and immediate military advantages ; but in showing to the world that your army could be divided, putting the stronger part to an important new service, and yet leaving enough to vanquish the old opposing force of the whole, — Hood's army, — it brings those who sat in darkness to see a great light. But what next ? I suppose it will be safe if I leave General Grant and yourself to decide. Please make my grateful acknowledgments to your whole army— officers...

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