The Popular Science Monthly, Band 74

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McClure, Phillips and Company, 1909
 

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Seite 184 - IT was six men of Indostan To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant (Though all of them were blind), That each by observation Might satisfy his mind. The First approached the Elephant, And happening to fall Against his broad and sturdy side, At once began to bawl: "God bless me! but the Elephant Is very like a wall!
Seite 185 - And so these men of Indostan Disputed loud and long, Each in his own opinion Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right, And all were in the wrong!
Seite 71 - But I have understanding as well as you; I am not inferior to you: yea, who knoweth not such things as these?
Seite 315 - Therefore my success as a man of science, whatever this may have amounted to, has been determined, as far as I can judge, by complex and diversified mental qualities and conditions. Of these, the most important have been — the love of science — unbounded patience in long reflecting over any subject — industry in observing and collecting facts — and a fair share of invention as well as of common sense.
Seite 43 - Up to the age of thirty, or beyond it, poetry of many kinds, such as the works of Milton, Gray, Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Shelley, gave me great pleasure, and even as a schoolboy I took intense delight in Shakespeare, especially in the historical plays. I have also said that formerly pictures gave me considerable, and music very great delight.
Seite 43 - My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts...
Seite 43 - If I had to live my life again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept alive through use.
Seite 45 - None can reply— all seems eternal now. The wilderness has a mysterious tongue Which teaches awful doubt,— or faith so mild, So solemn, so serene, that Man may be, But for such faith, with Nature reconciled. Thou hast a voice, great Mountain, to repeal Large codes of fraud and woe; not understood By all, but which the wise and great and good Interpret, or make felt, or deeply feel.
Seite 370 - This problem is the tendency in organic beings descended from the same stock to diverge in character as they become modified. That they have diverged greatly is obvious from the manner in which species of all kinds can be classed under genera, genera under families, families under sub-orders and so forth...
Seite 196 - It has been truly said that the 'seeds of great discoveries are constantly floating around us, but they only take root in minds well prepared to receive them.

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