The Excursion: A Poem

Capa
Moxon, 1853 - 374 páginas
 

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Página 112 - Even such a shell the universe itself Is to the ear of Faith ; and there are times, I doubt not, when to you it doth impart Authentic tidings of invisible things; Of ebb and flow, and ever-during power; And central peace, subsisting at the heart Of endless agitation.
Página 183 - The primal duties shine aloft — like stars ; The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, Are scattered at the feet of Man — like flowers.
Página iii - Beauty — a living Presence of the earth, Surpassing the most fair ideal Forms Which craft of delicate Spirits hath composed From earth's materials — waits upon my steps ; Pitches her tents before me as I move, An hourly neighbour.
Página 109 - Within the soul a Faculty abides, That with interpositions, which would hide And darken, so can deal, that they become Contingencies of pomp ; and serve to exalt Her native brightness. As the ample Moon, In the deep stillness of a Summer Even Rising behind a thick and lofty grove, Burns like an unconsuming fire of light, In the green trees ; and, kindling on all sides Their leafy umbrage, turns the dusky veil Into a substance glorious as her own, Yea with her own incorporated, by power Capacious...
Página 77 - Turned inward, to examine of what stuff Time's fetters are composed ; and life was put To inquisition long and profitless! By pain of heart now checked — and now impelled — The intellectual power, through words and things, Went sounding on, a dim and perilous way...
Página 58 - ... voice; — the clouds, The mist, the shadows, light of golden suns, Motions of moonlight, all come thither — touch, And have an answer — thither come, and shape A language not unwelcome to sick hearts And idle spirits : — there the sun himself, At the calm close of summer's longest day, Rests his substantial Orb ; — between those heights And on the top of either pinnacle, More keenly than elsewhere in night's blue vault, Sparkle the Stars, as of their station proud. Thoughts are not busier...
Página 104 - For, the Man — Who, in this spirit, communes with the Forms Of Nature, who with understanding heart 1210 Both knows and loves such objects as excite No morbid passions, no disquietude, No vengeance, and no hatred — needs must feel The joy of that pure principle of love So deeply, that, unsatisfied with aught Less pure and exquisite, he cannot choose But seek for objects of a kindred love In fellow-natures and a kindred joy.
Página i - On Man, on Nature, and on Human Life, Musing in solitude, I oft perceive Fair trains of imagery before me rise, Accompanied by feelings of delight Pure, or with no unpleasing sadness mixed ; And I am conscious of affecting thoughts And dear remembrances, whose presence soothes Or elevates the Mind, intent to weigh The good and evil of our mortal state. — To these emotions, whenceeoe'er they come, Whether from breath of outward circumstance, Or from the Soul— an impulse to herself— I would give...
Página 92 - ONE adequate support For the calamities of mortal life Exists, one only — an assured belief That the procession of our fate, howe'er Sad or disturbed, is ordered by a Being Of infinite benevolence and power ; Whose everlasting purposes embrace All accidents, converting them to good. The darts of anguish fix not where the seat Of suffering hath been thoroughly fortified By acquiescence in the Will Supreme, For time and for eternity...
Página iii - Such grateful haunts foregoing, if I oft Must turn elsewhere — to travel near the tribes And fellowships of men, and see ill sights Of madding passions mutually inflamed ; Must hear Humanity in fields and groves Pipe solitary anguish ; or must hang Brooding above the fierce confederate storm Of sorrow, barricadoed evermore Within the walls of cities...

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