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rage and virtue to signify to the sovereign, that it is neither becoming the dignity, nor consistent with the character of the common father of all his subjects, to insist on a tribute from a part of them, which, though nominally granted by themselves, was assuredly obtained by fraud and oppression, and of which the continuance is a check to honest industry, and perhaps the immediate cause of the decline of this beautiful and once valuable colony.

Barbadoes is divided into five districts, and eleven parishes; and contains four towns, Bridgetown, Ostins or Charles town, St. James's (formerly called The Hole), and Speight's town. Bridge town, the capital, before it was destroyed by the fires of 1766, consisted of about fifteen hundred houses, which were mostly built of brick; and it is still the seat of government, and may be called the chief residence of the governor, who is provided with a country villa called Pilgrims, situated within a mile of it: his salary was raised by queen Anne from twelve hundred to two thousand pounds per annum, the whole of which is paid out of the exchequer, and charged to the account of the four and a half per cent. duty. The form of the government of this island so very nearly resembles that of Jamaica, which has already been described, that it is unnecessary to enter into detail, except to observe, that the council is composed of twelve members, and the assembly of twenty-two. The most important variation respects the court of chancery, which in Barbadoes

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is constituted of the governor and council, whereas in Jamaica the governor is sole chancellor. On the other hand, in Barbadoes, the governor sits.in council, even when the latter are acting in a legis. lative capacity. This, in Jamaica, would be considered improper and unconstitutiopal. It may

also be observed, that the courts of grand sessions, common pleas, and exchequer, in Barbadoes, are distinct from each other, and not, as in Jamaica united and blended in one supreme court of judicature.

I shall close my account of Barbadoes with the following authentic documents :

41

An Account of the Number of Vessels, their Tonnage and Number of Men, (including their repcated Voyages),

that cleared Outwards from the Island of Barbadoes to all parts of the World, between the 5th of January 1787 and the 5th of January 1788; with the Species, Quantities, and Value of their Cargoes, according to the actual Prices in London, as made out by the Inspector-General of Great Britain.

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TOTAL VALUE

in Sterl. Money agreeable to the London market.

No. Tons. Men Cwt. qrs. Ib. Galls. Gallons. Cwt. qr. Ib.

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1,089

ΤΟ Great Britain Ireland American States Br. Am. Colonies Foreign W. Indies Africa

5,437 2 18 2,640,725 240 124

65,259 5

Oo

66 11,221 833130,242 O 1628689 3 317 28

2,114 0

of 25200 54 6,416 379

2,668 0

0 213400 411 3,182 237

2,742 0 0 146100 78 5,694 4581

2000 87 7 기

100

700 11,700

£.

. 5 45,948 19 1 486,570 4 8 o 35 7 10

11,521 15 10 23,217 13 41

18,080 6 32

207

8 15

38 5

69 16

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Total

243 26,9171942137,766 o 16.4254891 13,489

5,561 2 -182,705,97 51 245

5/46,124 ; ul 539,605 14 10

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42

Produce of the Island of Barbadoes exported, for seven years, from 1786 to 1792, both inclusive.

ALOES.

COTTON

SUGAR.

MELASSES.

GINGER.

RUM

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1

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3,386

3.008
5,064

AD
Hhds. Trcs. Blls. Hhus. Tres. Hads. Trs. Blls. Bags & Blls. Ahds. Tres. Gourds. Bags.

lbs.
1786 8,659 82 31419 114

5,199 39 693
8070

409

8,864
1787,11,929 183 2,415
87 37 3,872 27 614 6095

688 10,511
1788 10.309
63 3.674)

607
5364

303

1,894,365
1789, 9, 21 96 4,520

3,172

5180
397

372

1,327,840
1790 9,998 123 2,935
2,331 261 4565

475

1,287,088
60 2,346 30

411 3735

770

1,163,1571
(1792 17,073* 125 2,698 188
5121 3046

974,1781

515
* From this great increase in the export of sugar, and decrease in that of the minor staples, it seems probable, that the advan-
ced price of that article in Europe, has encouraged the cultivation of that article on plantations which had formerly been abandon-
ed, or appropriated to a different line of culture.
Account of the Number of Negroes in Barbudoes, and Amount of the Public Taxes for seven years,

from 1736 to 1792, both inclusive.
A D No. of Slaves. Do. imported. Amount of Taxes.

The taxes thus levied on the public consist of a capitation

tax on negroes.-A tax on sugar mills, dwelling houses, and 62,115 £10,138 14 21

carriages; together with an excise, &c. on wines imported. 17871

13,528 15 1

Besides all which there is a parochial tax on land, amounting on 63,557 1585 8,382 45

average throughout the island, to about two shillings per acre ; 17891 63 870

5,534 18

and an assessment in labour for the repair of the highways. 1790 64,068

131 13,482 19

The whole is altogether exclusive of the heavy duty of 41 per 1791 63,250

426 6,203 111

cent, to the crown. 17921 64,330

744 9,445 19

3

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1786

62.712

1788

556

2

CHAPTER 11.

GRENADA

AND ITS DEPENDENCIES.

First discovery, name, and inhabitants.---French invasion

and establishment in 1650.-War with, and ertermination of the natives.-The island and its dependencies conveyed to the Count de Cerillac.Misconduct and punishment of the deputy-governor.-The colony reverts to the crown of France.--State of the island in 1700.-And again in 1762, when captured by the English.-Stipulations in favour of the French inhabitants. -First measures of the British government.-Claim of the crown to levy a duty of four and a half per cent. on produce exported.- Arguments for and objections against the measure.-- Decision of the court of King's Bench on this important question.--Strictures on some positions advanced by the lord chief justice on this occa, sion.Transactions within the colony.--Royal instructions in favour of the Roman Catholic capitulants.-Internal dissentions.-Defenceless state.-French invasion in 1779.-Brave defence of the garrison.-Unconditional surrender.-- Hardships erercised towards the English planters and their creditors.--Redress given by the court of France.-Grenada, &c. restored to Great Britain by the peace of 1783.-Present state of the colony in respect to cultivation, productions, and é.x ports; government and population, Postcript. Appendir.

RENADA was discovered by, and received

its name from, Christopher Columbus, in his third voyage, in the year 1498. year 1498. He found it

pos

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