The Cambridge Companion to Plato

Capa
Richard Kraut
Cambridge University Press, 30 de out. de 1992 - 560 páginas
Plato stands as the fount of our philosophical tradition, being the first Western thinker to produce a body of writing that touches upon a wide range of topics still discussed by philosophers today. In a sense he invented philosophy as a distinct subject, for although many of these topics were discussed by his intellectual predecessors and contemporaries, he was the first to bring them together by giving them a unitary treatment. This volume contains fourteen new essays discussing Plato's views about knowledge, reality, mathematics, politics, ethics, love, poetry, and religion. There are also analyses of the intellectual and social background of his thought, the development of his philosophy throughout his career, the range of alternative approaches to his work, and the stylometry of his writing.
 

Conteúdo

IV
1
VI
51
VII
90
VIII
121
IX
170
XI
200
XII
227
XIII
248
XVI
338
XVII
365
XVIII
397
XIX
425
XX
464
XXI
493
XXII
531
XXIII
541

XIV
277
XV
311

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