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Manufaktures at Birmingham The Leafowes

Elegant landscapes Lord Littleton's at

Hagley - The park - Woods Cascades

Beautiful and pi&turesque scenes,

P. 279 to 280.

L ET TER XXII.

Husbandry from Hagley to Oxford — Lord Lit-

tleton's experiments in draining Manufactures
at Worcester - Excellent busbandry in the Vale
of Evesham

- Mr. Penny's experiments in
agriculture -- On planting wheat On steeps -
On barley -- On Lucerne - Earl of Lichfield's
at Ditchley - City of Oxford -General Guise's
pictures - Christ Church - Radcliff library -

Pieture

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Picture gallery - Pomfret statues Arundelian marbles - Bodleian library,

Page 281 to 327

L ET TER XXIII.

State of busbandry from Oxford to North Mims — Culture near London - Nurseries - Gardens

Enfield Chace,

P. 328 to 377;

LETTER XXIV.

General review - Produkts of wheat, barley, oats, and rye - Comparison with rents - Averages Remarks -- Rents,

P. 378 to 425.

L E T T E R XXV.

Products of pease, beans, turneps, &c. Ave.

rages - Compared with rents Remarks on boeing pease and beans - On turnep boeing State of that praktice -- Comparison,

P. 426 to 464.

>

1

А

SIX MONTHS TOUR, &c.

L E T TER XV.

F

ز

ROM Raby to Durham the land is in general very good, letting fo high as

from 155. to 31. but the average is not above 21 s. or 22 S. Farms in general under an hundred a year.

About that city there is much mustard cultivated : The farmers sow it alone, on good rich moist land; and on that which is pared and burnt. They get from thirty to an hundred bushels per acre; and the price varies from 10s. to 205. a bushel ; some crops worth 100l. an acre have been known. When once mustard has been fown on a piece of land, it can never be got out again : In tillage it rises with every crop that is sown, which obliges the farmers to lay down such lands to grass, which smothers it, but if broke up again centuries afterwards, a crop of mustard is sure to rise.

Taking the road to Newcastle *, we found

* The ornamented grounds of Carr, Esq; at Cocken, are laid out with so much taste, that Vol. III.

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the land in general good, and let very high. That town is too famous in the path of it is a great omission in any traveller to pass without seeing them : That Gentleman and his Lady, Lady Mary Carr, have both given much attention to the affifting nature in their very

beautiful spot, by rendering her accessible.

Cocken has the advantage of a fine river, in some places very rapid, and in others calm and smooth; it takes a waving course through the grounds, and has the noble advantage of a various shoar, in some places composed of noble rocks, in others of hanging woods, and also of cultivated inclosures : Art has judiciously aimed at nothing more than enabling the spectator to view these beauties to the best advantage.

The first point to which we were conducted, is a seat in a small circular plot, among the wood, north of the house, from which Chester steeple is caught in a very picturesque manner, between two projecting hills of wood: The spot is on the brink of a precipice, at the bottom of which the river bends very finely: The country is in general wild and uncultivated; but to the left is a hill of wood, which varies the scene.

Winding a little to the left, the walk leads to the dairy, from which, though very near the seat just described, the view is at once quite different, The country is now cultivated, the river divides, and you command it both ways. To the right is a scar of rock, crowned with pendent wood.

You are next conducted down the hill, and pursue the walk around a large meadow upon the banks of the river; it then enters a wood under a most romantic wall of rock; the walk (a

terrass

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