Two Chapters of Irish History, Volume 1

Capa
MacMillan, 1888 - 154 páginas
 

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Página 102 - Roman catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland, or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles II.; and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Página 144 - Catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland : or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles the Second : and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman Catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Página 144 - James, or those authorised by him to grant the same, in the several counties of Limerick, Clare, Kerry, Cork and Mayo, or any of them; and all the commissioned officers in their majesties quarters, that belong to the Irish regiments, now in being, that are treated with, and who are not prisoners of war, or have taken protection, and who shall return and submit to their majesties...
Página 147 - Lucan of his said engagement, past on their public account for payment of the said Protestants, and for preventing the ruin of the said John Brown and for satisfaction of his creditors at the instance of the Lord Lucan and the rest of the persons aforesaid, it is agreed that the said Lords Justices and...
Página 145 - And whereas these present wars have drawn on great violences on both parts ; and that if leave were given to the bringing all sorts of private actions, the animosities would probably continue that have been too long on foot, and the public disturbances last ; for the quieting and settling therefore of this kingdom, and avoiding those inconveniences which would be the necessary consequence of the contrary, no person or persons whatsoever, comprised in the foregoing articles, shall be sued, molested,...
Página 82 - A mortgage for a thousand pounds was cleared off by a bag of counters made out of old kettles. The creditors who complained to the Court of Chancery were told by Fitton to take their money and be gone.
Página 146 - Limerick, and other garrisons, shall be permitted to remove their goods, chattels, and provisions, out of the same, without being viewed and searched, or paying any manner of duties, and shall not be compelled to leave the houses or lodgings they now have, for the space of six weeks next ensuing the date hereof. IX. The oath to be administered to such Roman Catholics as submit to their majesties' government shall be the oath abovesaid, and no other.
Página 148 - Mayo or any of them" in the second of the said articles, the words following, viz., "and all such as are under their protection in the said counties", should be inserted and be part of the said articles, which words having been casually omitted by the writer, the omission was not discovered till after the said articles were signed, but was taken notice of before the second town was surrendered ; and that our said Justices and General, or one of them, did promise that the said clause should be made...
Página 153 - XXV. — That it shall be lawful for the said garrison to march out all at once, or at different times, as they can be embarked, with arms, baggage, drums beating, match lighted at both ends, bullet in mouth, colours flying...

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