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turn over the dear old book? Come let me know the subject of your studies this morning ?”.

"I was looking for the Shepherd King, Miss Emmeline,” replied Barbara, and trying to follow him, wherever I could find him.

Indeed, said Emmeline, half playfully, half surprisedly, and I trust you found him ?

“I could find him easily by the marks I made that day,—that happy day, long long ago, Miss Emmeline,” returned the child, heaving a gentle sigh.

“What wonderful day was that, my dear,” asked the young lady?

“We were in the park, ma'am,” returned the child, “my own dear uncle and myself, and Cæsar, and we saw a shepherd at a distance driving a flock of sheep up a winding lane, towards a green hill, which we knew to be very pleasant in fine weather, and then my uncle told me that Horace had taught him, that whenever he saw a shepherd with his Rock, he must think of his Saviour, because it is written of him ( Isaiah, xl. 11.) “He shall feed his flock like a shepherd: he shall gather the lambs in his arm, and carry them in his bosom, and shall gently lead those that are with young.My uncle never forgot anything which Horace had taught him ; so then we began to look for all the places where the Good Shepherd is to be found; for you know, Miss Emmeline, that there are bad shepherds in the Bible.”

Miss Emmeline might have answered, “ I know no such thing;" but according to the old saying, she kept her own counsel ; and Barbara whose young mouth was opened by a sense of happiness, never before enjoyed in that house, went on with her sweet communications. “That was our shepherd-time,” she said, “and it was when the trees were in blossom, my own dear Miss Emmeline, and I called it our shepherd time, because we were talking of nothing but shepherds then, but it lasted for many days. We looked for all the verses then about shepherds, I mean particularly the Good Shepherd - and when we found them, I marked them, but I think there are more which we have not found. You will be so kind, won't you, Miss Emmeline, to look at my verses, and shew me those I have missed ?” subjoined the little girl, looking earnestly at her young friend, as children so well know how to look, when they wish to gain a point.

Miss Loveday knew not how to reply: she was therefore glad when Barbara thus continued, “I have been thinking how good; how very, very good, God is,” she said, “to bring you here to love me, and to teach me as Horace taught my uncle ; and I have been thinking how the love of God comes to us, through so many, many ways. It seems to me, when I was getting more and more unhappy, as if God sent you to tell me, that he had not forgotten me. If you had come sooner, perhaps I should not have been so very, very glad.”

The more the child spoke, the more Miss Loveday felt confused. She had once or twice met with persons, who though perhaps really religious, had offended her with using such modes of speech, as are by worldly persons called cant; but there was a freshness and simplicity, and an elegance of sentiment, in little Barbara's communication so very unlike the style she disliked, that she could not doubt its genuineness, and she felt assured, that the affections and convictions of the child went with all she said. Through the divine blessing, there was scarcely a word which the little one uttered, which did not take strong hold upon Emme. line's mind, so much so, that when the school bell called the child away from her, she was left like one just waking from a very long dream ; for, probably, till that crisis of time, it had never entered into her mind, that this world with all its frivolous pursuits, was but a deceptive shadowy thing, whilst that hitherto despised religion dealt only in the realities of existence.

“Suppose,” said she to herself “that it is so ; then this despised child is the only one in this far-famed establishment, as far as I can judge, who holds the truth : whilst all the rest, myself among them, have hitherto been only devoted to the pursuit of variegated shadows : all, all of which must vanish in the darkness of the grave.”

It was observed that Miss Loveday looked very serious, and had nothing to say at breakfast ; but this symptom of something wrong, was set down to some caprice of temper, and therefore passed over by the sisterhood.

Miss Loveday saw no more of Barbara till she came up to her room, at the hour in which the pupils retired, and there and then, won by the pleadings of the child, she consented to read the Bible aloud to her, whilst she was preparing to get to bed,

turn over the dear old book? Come let me know the subject of your studies this morning?”

“I was looking for the Shepherd King, Miss Emmeline,” replied Barbara, and trying to follow him, wherever I could find him

Indeed, said Emmeline, half playfully, half surprisedly, and . trust you found him ?

"I could find him easily by the marks I made that day,—tha happy day, long long ago, Miss Emmeline,” returned the chik heaving a gentle sigh.

“What wonderful day was that, my dear,” asked the your lady?

We were in the park, ma'am," returned the child,"my of dear uncle and myself, and Cæsar, and we saw a shepherd af distance driving a flock of sheep up a winding lane, toward . green hill, which we knew to be very pleasant in fine weath and then my uncle told me that Horace had taught him, to whenever he saw a shepherd with his flock, he must think of Saviour, because it is written of him (Isaiah, xl. 11.) “He s feed his flock like a shepherd: he shall gather the lambs in arm, and carry them in his bosom, and shall gently lead th that are with young.” My uncle never forgot anything wl Horace had taught him; so then we began to look for all places where the Good Shepherd is to be found; for you kn Miss Emmeline, that there are bad shepherds in the Bill

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a custom which being commenced that night, was carried on with a small interruption till the Christmas holidays : whilst it never once entered into the mind of Barbara, that she was by the ti divine blessing, pouring of the fulness of the Living Rill intrusted to her keeping, into the breast of her companion, by her various little notes and comments, though Emmeline was enabled to feel from day to day, that so it was. But whilst the noblest, loftiest, and best directed efforts of man, to convey instruction to another, may sometimes fail, it not unfrequently happens, that the very humblest instruments are made available by God's blessing. And so it ought to be, lest man should glory in his own wisdom, and should say “ Behold what have I done.” The value of the instructions thus conveyed from the younger to the elder, as related in our narrative, consisted in the gift which was conferred on her, (through the ministry of that simple one, of whom it might have been truly said, he had but one idea, and that was Christ in all, and all in Christ), of discerning, and being able to point out, in her own child-like way, indeed, the bearing of almost every passage of scripture which was brought forward on the great scheme of salvation by Jesus Christ. She knew nothing of doubtful and perplexing questions-she had never heard of polemical disputes, and controversies on ecclesiastical matters, but the Father had revealed himself to her, as he does sometimes to men and babes, and the Holy Ghost had given her power to comprehend as clearly as the saint of matured years, the leading truths of the gospel. And speaking from experience, and as man can only speak, a little child is often much more apt in understanding what is meant by the Father's love, than others more advanced in life.

Although there is no doubt that a mighty work was going on under the roof of the establishment of Mrs. St. Leger, and the Misses Greatorex, yet was it not suspected in the family during the whole of the interval between the Midsummer and Christmas holidays, at which time Miss Loveday went to visit a friend in the country, and Barbara was permitted to keep her place in her friend's room. It was at that period that the child wrote the letter formerly introduced, and though she used no means to conceal it, it was suffered to pass without inspection.

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