The Role of Thunder in Finnegans Wake

Capa
University of Toronto Press, 1 de jan. de 1997 - 340 páginas

James Joyce's use of ten one hundred-letter words in Finnegans Wake has always been an intriguing feature of that novel. Eric McLuhan takes a new by placing the Wake in the tradition of Menippean satire, where language is used to shock and provoke. Seen in this light, Joyce's peculiar language and style become part of this Menippean tradition through his use of the linguistic 'thunderclap'.

The Role of Thunder in Finnegans Wake is the first book to examine this strangest and most prominent aspect of the language of the Wake, and explain its use in the context of classical Greek literature. Each thunderclap is a resonating logos that represents a transformation of human culture. McLuhan presents the thunders as encoding Joyce's study of ten major communications revolutions, ranging from neolithic technologies such as speech and fire, through cities, the railroad, and print, to radio, movies, and television. Seen in this fashion, Finnegans Wake is both an encyclopedia of the effects of technology in reshaping human culture and society, and a complete training course for detecting the changes in sensibility occasioned by new media.

 

Conteúdo

Cynic Satire
3
An Ancient Attack on Modern
14
Introduction to Part II
37
The Prankquean She Stoops
56
HCE The New Womanly Man
75
The Fall of the Garden Itself
93
Belinda the Hen
110
The Phoenix Playhouse
133
The Reciprocating Engine
192
Television The Charge of the Light Brigade
213
Conclusion
235
On the Composition of the Thunders
243
Outline of the Menippean Tradition
254
NOTES
267
BIBLIOGRAPHY
325
INDEX
335

Radio
152
Sound Film The Royal Wedding
172

Termos e frases comuns

Sobre o autor (1997)

Eric McLuhan is an author, editor, and teacher. He has worked closely with Marshall McLuhan, with whom he studied Finnegans Wake. He now lectures and writes on media and society, and edits the journal McLuhan Studies.

Informações bibliográficas