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Opprobriis dignum laceraverit, integer ipse ?
T. Solventur risu tabulæ : tu missus abibis.

NOTES,

Ver. 153. F. Indeed?] Hor.

“ Solventur risu tabulæ.” Some critics tell us, it is want of taste to put this line in the mouth of Trebatius. But our Poet confutes this censure, by shewing how well the sense of it agrees to his friend's character. The lawyer is cautious and fearful; but as soon as Sir ROBERT, the patron both of law and gospel, is named as approving them, he changes his note, and, in the language of old Plowden, owns, the case is altered. Now was it not as natural, when Horace had given him a hint that Augustus himself supported him, for Trebatius, a court advocate, who had been long a client to him and his uncle, to confess the case was altered?

Warburton. To laugh at the solemnity of Trebatius, which throughout the dialogue is exactly kept up, Horace puts him off with a mere play upon words. But our important lawyer takes no notice of the jest, and finishes with a gravity suited to his character :

“ Solyentur risu tabulæ: tu missus abibis." Warton.

Such as Sir ROBERT would approve

F. Indeed ? The case is alter'd-you may then proceed; 'In such a cause the plaintiff will be hiss'd, 155 My Lords the Judges laugh, and you're dismiss'd.

THE SECOND SATIRE

OF THE

SECOND BOOK OF HORACE.

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