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No.

246. On a Censorious Disposition Letters to De-
faulters-Characters of Plumbeus and Levis

Steele.
247. Letter from Almeira, an Edinburgh young lady

--And Answer by Mrs. Jenny Distaff: Steele.
248. On the Improvement of Beauty by Exercise--
Lazy Ladies—Very busy ones

Steele.

249. Adventures of a Shilling,

Addison.

250. Institution of a Court of Honour

251. On Virtuous Independence- Where true Hap-
piness is to be found

Steele.
252. Defence of Sober Drinking-Letter from Ralph
and Bridget Yokefellow

Steele.

253. Journal of the Court of Honour

Addison and Steele.

254. Sir John Mandeville's Account of the Freezing

and Thawing of several Speeches

Addison and Steele.

255. Letter from a Chaplain-Thoughts on the
Treatment of Chaplains

Addison.

256. Proceedings of the Court of Honour

Addison and Steele.

257. Wax-work Representation of the Religions of

Great Britain

Addison and Steele.

258. Letter on the Use of the Phrase North Briton :

Swift, Prior, Rowe--On" a Person of Quality":
A Lady invested by several Lovers—From a
Chaplain—Taliacotius—Bachelors Steele.

259. Journal of the Court of Honour

Addison and Steele,

260. Essay on Noses-Skill of Taliacotius

Addison and Steele.

261. Plan for the Encouragement of Wedlock-In-

stance of Public Spirit-Celamico's Will · Steele.

262. Journal of the Court of Honour

Addison and Steele.

263. On the different Hours kept in Modern Times

-College Hours-Early Hours

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THE

TATLER.

N 210. SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1710.

Sheer-lane, August 10. I DID myself the honour this day to make a visit to a lady of quality, who is one of those that are ever railing at the vices of the age; but mean only one vice, because it is the only vice they are not guilty of. She went so far as to fall foul on a young woman who has had imputations; but whether they were just or not, no one knows but herself. However that is, she is in her present behaviour modest, humble, pious, and discreet. I thought it became me to bring this censorious lady to reason, and let her see she was a much more vicious woman than the person she spoke of.

Madam,' said I, you are very severe to this poor young woman, for a trespass which I believe Heaven has forgiven her, and for which, you see, she is for ever out of countenance.'— Nay, Mr. Bickerstaff,' she interrupted, “ if you at this time of day contradict people of virtue, and stand up for ill women-'-'No, no, Madam,' said I, ‘not so fast; she is reclaimed, and I fear you never will be. Nay, nay, Madam, do not be in a passion; but let me tell you what you are.

You are indeed as good as your neighbours; but that is being very bad. You are a

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