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Act of March may within six months appeal to the Comptroller against such settle

3, 1809, ch. 28, ment.(a)

sec. 2. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Duties of the Register to keep all accounts of the receipts and expenditures of the

Register. public money, and of all debts due to or from the United States; to receive from the Comptroller the accounts which shall have been finally adjusted, and to preserve such accounts with their vouchers and certificates; to record all warrants for the receipt or payment of monies at the Treasury, certify the same thereon, and to transmit to the Secretary of the Treasury, copies of the certificates of balances of accounts adjusted as is herein directed.

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That whenever the Secretary Secretary reshall be removed from office by the President of the United States, or office vacant,

moved, or his in any other case of vacancy in the office of Secretary, the Assistant assistant secreshall, during the vacancy, have the charge and custody of the records, tary to have books, and papers appertaining to the said office.

custody of re

cords, &c. Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That no person appointed to any Persons apoffice instituted by this act, shall directly or indirectly be concerned or pointed to office interested in carrying on the business of trade or commerce, or be under this act, owner in whole or in part of any sea-vessel, or purchase by himself, or Prohibition upanother in trust for him, any public lands or other public property, or be on. concerned in the purchase or disposal of any public securities of any State, or of the United States, or take or apply to his own use, any emolument or gain for negotiating or transacting any business in the said department, other than what shall be allowed by law; and if any Penalty for person shall offend against any of the prohibitions of this act, he shall breach of the be deemed guilty of a high misdemeanor, and forfeit to the United States prohibitions of

the law. the penalty of three thousand dollars, and shall upon conviction be removed from office, and forever thereafter incapable of holding any office under the United States : Provided, That if any other person than a public prosecutor shall give information of any such offence, upon which a prosecution and conviction shall be had, one half the aforesaid pen- 1791, ch. 18, alty of three thousand dollars, when recovered, shall be for the use of sec. 3. the person giving such information. APPROVED, September 2, 1789.

STATUTE I. CHAP. XIII.-An Act for establishing the Salaries of the Executive Officers of Sept. 11, 1789.

Government, with their Assistants and Clerks.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa-

Annual sala. tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That there shall be allowed to the officers hereafter mentioned, the following payable quar

ries established, annual salaries, payable quarterly at the Treasury of the United States : terly:

Rate of com. to the Secretary of the Treasury, three thousand five hundred dollars ;

pensation to the Secretary in the Department of State, three thousand five hundred dollars; to the Secretary in the Department of War, three thousand dollars ;(b) to the Comptroller of the Treasury, two thousand dollars; to the Auditor, fifteen hundred dollars; to the Treasurer, two thousand dollars; (c) to the Register, twelve hundred and fifty dollars ;

(a) See act of May 8, 1792 ; act of March 3, 1809, chap. 28.

(b) By the act of March 2, 1799, chap. 38, the salary of the Secretary of State was fixed at five thousand dollars; the Secretary of the Treasury at five thousand dollars ; the Secretary of War at four thousand five hundred dollars; the Secretary of the Navy at four thousand five hundred dollars per annum. By the act of February 20, 1819, chap. 27, the salaries of the Secretary of State, of the Secretary of the Treasury, of the Secretary of War, and the Secretary of the Navy, were fixed at six thousand dollars per annum. By the act of March 2, 1827, chap. 62, the salary of the Postmaster General was raised to $6000.

(C) By the act of March 2, 1793, the sum of five hundred dollarg was added to the salary of the Auditor, and two hundred and fifty dollars to the salaries of the Comptroller and Register of the Treasury. By the act of March 2, 1799, chap. 38, the salaries of the Comptroller, the Treasurer, and the Auditor of the Treasury were fixed at three thousand dollars, and the Register of the Treasury at two thousand four hundred dollars. By the act of March 3, 1817, chap. 45, the officers in the Treasury Department

to the Governor of the western territory, for his salary as such, and for discharging the duties of superintendent of Indian affairs in the northern department, two thousand dollars; to the three judges of the western territory each, eight hundred dollars; to the Assistant of the Secretary of the Treasury, fifteen hundred dollars; to the Chief Clerk in the Department of State, eight hundred dollars; to the Chief Clerk in the Department of War, six hundred dollars; to the Secretary of the western territory, seven hundred and fifty dollars; to the principal Clerk of the Comptroller, eight hundred dollars; to the principal Clerk of the Auditor, six hundred dollars; to the principal Clerk of the Treasurer,

six hundred dollars. Heads of de.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the heads of the three de partments to appoint clerks, partments first above mentioned, shall appoint such clerks therein reTheir salaries. spectively as they shall find necessary; and the salary of the said clerks

respectively shall not exceed the rate of five hundred dollars per annum.

APPROVED, September 11, 1789.

STATUTE I.

on

Sept. 15, 1789. CHAP. XIV.-An Act to provide for the safe-keeping of the Acts, Records and Seal (Obsolete.)

of the United States, and for other purposes. [Act of July Section, 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa27, 1789, ch. 4.) tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the

Department of foreign af.

Executive department, denominated the Department of Foreign Affairs, fairs changed to shall hereafter be denominated the Department of State, and the printhe department cipal officer therein shall hereafter be called the Secretary of State. of state. Additional dų. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That whenever a bill

, order, reso ties assigned the lution, or vote of the Senate and House of Representatives, having been secretary of the said depart

approved and signed by the President of the United States, or not havment.

ing been returned by him with his objections, shall become a law, or take effect, it shall forthwith thereafter be received by the said Secretary from the President; and whenever a bill

, order, resolution, or vote, shall be returned by the President with his objections, and shall, being reconsidered, be agreed to be passed, and be approved by twothirds of both Houses of Congress, and thereby become a law or take effect, it shall, in such case, be received by the said Secretary from the President of the Senate, or the Speaker of the House of Representatives, in whichsoever House it shall last have been so approved; and the said Secretary shall, as soon as conveniently may be, after he shall receive the same, cause every such law, order, resolution, and vote, to be published in at least three of the public newspapers printed within the United States, and shall also cause one printed copy to be delivered to each Senator and Representative of the United States, and two printed copies duly authenticated to be sent to the Executive authority

of each State; and he shall carefully preserve the originals, and shall Act 2, 1799, ch. 30, cause the same to be recorded in books to be provided for the pursec. 1 and 4. pose.(a)

Seal of the U. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the seal heretofore used by States.

the United States in Congress assembled, shall be, and hereby is de

clared to be, the seal of the United States. Secretary to Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the said Secretary shall keep keep and affix the said seal, and shall make out and record, and shall affix the said the seal to all civil commis. seal to all civil commissions, to officers of the United States, to be apsions.

pointed by the President by and with the advice and consent of the were to be five auditors and one comptroller, and the salary of each of these officers was fixed at three thousand dollars,

(a) The acts for the general promulgation of the laws of the United States have been : The act of March 3, 1795; act of December 31, 1796 ; act of March 2, 1799, chap. 30; act of November 21, 1814; act of April 20, 1818, chap. 80; act of May 11, 1820, chap. 92. By the 21st section of the act of August 26, 1842, chap. 202, the laws of the United States are required to be published in not less than two nor more than four newspapers in Washington. 1838, ch. 187.

Senate, or by the President alone. Provided, That the said seal shall
not be affixed to any commission, before the same shall have been signed
by the President of the United States, nor to any other instrument or act,
without the special warrant of the President therefor.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the said Secretary shall cause Secretary to a seal of office to be made for the said department of such device as the provide a seal

of office.
President of the United States shall approve, and all copies of records
and papers in the said office, authenticated under the said seal, shall be
evidence equally as the original record or paper.

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That there shall be paid to the Fees of office
Secretary, for the use of the United States, the following fees of office, to be paid for
by the persons requiring the services to be performed, except when they u. States.
are performed for any officer of the United States, in a matter relating to
the duties of his office, to wit: For making out and authenticating copies
of records, ten cents for each sheet, containing one hundred words; for
authenticating a copy of a record or paper under the seal of office,
twenty-five cents.

Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That the said Secretary shall forth- Secretary to with after his appointment be entitled to have the custody and charge have custody of of the said seal of the United States, and also of all books, records and late Congress. papers, remaining in the office of the late Secretary of the United States in Congress assembled; and such of the said books, records and papers, as may appertain to the Treasury department, or War department, shall be delivered over to the principal officers in the said departments respectively, as the President of the United States shall direct.

APPROVED, September 15, 1789.

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STATUTE I. Chap. XV.-An Act to suspend part of an Act, intituled An Act to regulate the Sept. 16, 1789. collection of the Duties imposed by Law on the Tonnage of Ships or Vessels,

(Obsolete.) and on Goods, Wares, and Merchandises, imported into the United States," and for other purposes.

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That so Restriction on much of the act, intituled “ An act to regulate the collection of the

up the Potomac duties imposed by law, on the tonnage of ships or vessels, and on goods, suspended. wares, and merchandises, imported into the United States," as obliges Act of July ships or vessels bound up the river Potomac, to come to and deposit 31, 1789, ch. 5,

.
manifests of their cargoes, with the officers at St. Mary's and Yeocom-
ico, before they proceed to their port of delivery, shall be and is hereby
suspended until the first day of May next.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That all the privileges and ad- Privileges of vantages to which ships and vessels owned by citizens of the United ships, &c. of the States, are by law entitled, shall be, until the fifteenth day of January tended to ships next, extended to ships and vessels wholly owned by citizens of the &c. of N. CaroStates of North Carolina, and Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

Island, until the Provided, That the master of every such ship or vessel last mentioned, 15th January shall produce a register for the same, conformable to the laws of the next. state in which it shall have been obtained, showing that the said ship or 1790, ch. 1, 07. vessel is, and before the first day of September instant, was owned as aforesaid, and make oath or affirmation, before the collector of the port in which the benefit of this act is claimed, that the ship or vessel for which such register is produced, is the same therein mentioned, and that he believes it is still wholly owned by the person or persons named in said register, and that he or they are citizens of one of the states afore

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That all rum, loaf sugar, and

lina and Rhode

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Certain arti. chocolate, manufactured or made in the states of North Carolina, or duties as on fo. Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, and imported or brought into reign goods. the United States, shall be deemed and taken to be, subject to the like

duties, as goods of the like kinds, imported from any foreign state, king

dom or country, are made subject to. Rehoboth eg. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That Rehoboth, in the state of tablished a port Massachusetts, shall be a port of entry and delivery, until the fifteenth

day of January next, and that a collector be appointed for the same.

APPROVED, September 16, 1789. STATUTE I.

of entry.

1

Sept. 22. 1789.

[Obsolete.)

Powers and salary.

CAP. XVI.-An Act for the temporary establishment of the Post-Office.(a)

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That there shall be appointed a Postmaster General; his powers and salary,(6) and the compensation to the assistant or clerk and deputies which he may appoint, and the regulations of the post-office shall be the same as they last were under the resolutions and ordinances of the late Congress. The Postmaster General to be subject to the direction of the President of the United States in performing the duties of his office, and in forming contracts for the transportation of the mail.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That this act shall continue in force until the end of the next session of Congress, and no longer.

APPROVED, September 22, 1789.

Limitation. 1790, ch. 36. 1791, ch. 23. 1792, ch. 7.

STATUTE I.

Sept. 22, 1789. CHAP. XVII.-An Act for allowing Compensation to the Members of the Senate and (Obsolete.]

House of Representatives of the Uniled States, and to the Officers of both Houses. (c)

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of RepresentaSenators, tives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That at their allowance for attendance

every session of Congress, and at every meeting of the Senate in the and travelling,

recess of Congress, prior to the fourth day of March, in the year one prior to the 4th

thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, each Senator shall be entitled of March, 1795.

to receive six dollars, for every day he shall attend the Senate, and shall

also be allowed, at the commencement and end of every such session Act of March and meeting, six dollars for every twenty miles of the estimated distance, 10, 1796, ch. 4. Act of April

by the most usual road, from his place of residence to the seat of Con29, 1802, ch. 35. gress; and in case any member of the Senate shall be detained by sick

ness on his journey to or from any such session or meeting, or after his
arrival shall be unable to attend the Senate, he shall be entitled to the
same daily allowance: Provided always, That no Senator shall be
allowed a sum exceeding the rate of six dollars a day, from the end of
one such session or meeting to the time of his taking his seat in another.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That at every session of Congress,

and at every meeting of the Senate in the recess of Congress, after the (a) The acts passed for the establishment and regulation of the Post-office Department, and which are obsolete, have been, in addition to this act: Act of August 4, 1790, chap. 36; act of March 3, 1791, chap. 23; act of February 20, 1792; act of May 8, 1794; act of March 3, 1797, chap. 19; act of March 28, 1798, chap. 24; act of March 2, 1799, chap. 43; act of December 23, 1814 ; act of February 27, 1815; act of February 1, 1816, chap. 7; act of April 9, 1816, chap. 43; act of March 3, 1825, chap. 64.

The acts in force in reference to the Post-office Department are, the “ act concerning public contracts," April 21, 1808, chap. 48; act of March 2, 1827, chap. 61. An act to change the organization of the post-office department, and to provide more effectually for the settlement of the accounts thereof, July 2, 1836, chap. 270; resolution of March 2, 1837; act of March 3, 1845, chap. 43.

(b) By an act passed March 2, 1827, chap. 62, an addition was made to the salary of the Postmaster General of two thousand dollars, making the annual salary of that officer six thousand dollars.

(C) The acts of Congress, subsequent to this act, allowing compensation to members of the Senate and House of Representatives, &c., have been : Act of July 6, 1797, chap. 13; act of March 19, 1816, chap. 30; act of January 22, 1818, chap. 5; act of 1796, chap. 4.

aforesaid fourth day of March, in the year one thousand seven hundred Allowance for and ninety-five, each Senator shall be entitled to receive seven dollars

attendance and

travelling, after for every day he shall attend the Senate; and shall also be allowed at March 4, 1795. the commencement and end of every such session and meeting, seven dollars for every twenty miles of the estimated distance, by the most usual road, from his place of residence to the seat of Congress; and in case any inember of the Senate shall be detained by sickness, on his journey to or from any such session or meeting, or after his arrival shall be unable to attend the Senate, he shall be entitled to the same allowance of seven dollars a day: Provided always, That no Senator shall be allowed a sum exceeding the rate of seven dollars a day, from the end of

Repealed by

act of 1796, ch. one such session or meeting to the time of his taking a seat in another. 4. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That at every session of Congress,

Members of

the House of each Representative shall be entitled to receive six dollars for every day

Representahe shall attend the House of Representatives; and shall also be allowed tives, their alat the commencement and end of every session, six dollars for every lowance for at

tendance and twenty miles of the estimated distance, by the most usual road, from his

travelling. place of residence to the seat of Congress; and in case any Representative shall be detained by sickness, on his journey to or from the session of Congress, or after his arrival shall be unable to attend the House of Representatives, he shall be entitled to the daily allowance aforesaid; and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to defray the incidental expenses of his office, shall be entitled to receive in addition to his compensation as a Representative, six dollars for every day he shall attend the House : Provided always, That no Representative shall be allowed a sum exceeding the rate of six dollars a day, from the end of one such session or meeting to the time of his taking a seat in another.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to Chaplains, se. each chaplain of Congress, at the rate of five hundred dollars per annum clerks, their sa.

, during the session of Congress; to the secretary of the Senate and clerk laries and al. of the House of Representatives, fifieen hundred dollars per annum each, lowance. to commence from the time of their respective appointments; and also a further allowance of two dollars per day to each, during the session of that branch for which he officiates: and the said secretary and clerk shall each be allowed (when the President of the Senate or Speaker shall deem it necessary) to employ one principal clerk, who shall be paid three dollars per day, and an engrossing clerk, who shall be paid two dollars per day during the session, with the like compensation to such clerk while he shall be necessarily employed in the recess.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the following compensation shall be allowed to the officers herein after mentioned, viz: To the ser- Sergeant at geant at arms, during the sessions and while employed on the business arms and door. of the House, four dollars per day; the allowance of the present sergeant allowance for at arms to commence from the time of his appointment. To the door- services, atkeeper of the Senate and House of Representatives, for their services tendance, &c. in those offices, three dollars per day during the session of the House to which he may belong, for his own services, and for the hire of necessary labourers; the allowance to the present door-keeper of the Senate to commence from the day appointed for the meeting of Congress; and the allowance to the door-keeper of the House of Representatives to commence from his appointment; and to the assistant door-keeper to each House, two dollars per day during the sessions.

Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the said compensation which Compensa. shall be due to the members and officers of the Senate, shall be certified tions, how to be

certified. by the President; and that which shall be due to the members and officers of the House of Representatives, shall be certified by the Speaker; and the same shall be passed as public accounts, and paid out of the public treasury.

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