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STATUTE I.
April 14, 1792.

Chap. XXIV.-An Act concerning Consuls and Vice-Consuls.
For carrying into full effect the convention between the King of the
French, and the United States of America, entered into for the

purpose of defining and establishing the functions and privileges of their respec

tive Consuls and Vice-Consuls; Duty of Con- Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representasuls and district tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That where judges con

in the seventh article of the said convention, it is agreed that when there cerning wrecks.

shall be no consul or vice-consul of the King of the French, to attend to the saving of the wreck of any French vessels stranded on the coasts of the United States, or that the residence of the said consul, or viceconsul (he not being at the place of the wreck) shall be more distant from the said place than that of the competent judge of the country, the latter shall immediately proceed to perform the office therein prescribed; the district judge of the United States of the district in which the wreck shall happen, shall proceed therein, according to the tenor of the said article. And in such cases it shall be the duty of the officers of the customs within whose districts such wrecks shall happen, to give notice thereof, as soon as may be, to the said judge, and to aid and assist him to perform the duties hereby assigned to him. The district judges of the United States shall also, within their respective districts be the competent judges, for the purposes expressed in the ninth article of the said convention, and it shall be incumbent on them to give aid to the consuls and vice-consuls of the King of the French, in arresting and securing deserters from vessels of the French nation according to the tenor of the said article.

And where by any article of the said convention, the consuls and Duty of Marshals.

vice-consuls of the King of the French, are entitled to the aid of the competent executive officers of the country, in the execution of any precept, the marshals of the United States and their deputies shall,

within their respective districts, be the competent officers, and shall give Where com. their aid according to the tenor of the stipulations. mitments shall

And whenever commitments to the jails of the country shall become be made.

necessary in pursuance of any stipulation of the said convention, they shall be to such jails within the respective districts as other commitments

under the authority of the United States are by law made. (a) Act of July 6, 1797, chap. 12; act of February 28, 1803, chap. 9; act of February 28, 1811, chap. 28; act of March 3, 1813, chap. 42, sec. 6. 1810, ch. 39.

The decisions of the courts of the United States upon the powers, duties, and obligations of consuls, have been :

A foreign consul has a right to claim or institute a proceeding in rem where the rights of property of his fellow-citizens are in question, without a special procuration from those for whose benefit he acts. The Bello Corrunnes, 6 Wheat, 152; 5 Cond. Rep. 45.

A consul cannot receive actual restitution of the res in controversy, without a special authority. To watch over the rights and interests of their subjects, wherever the pursuits of commerce may draw them, or the vicissitudes of human affairs may force them, are the great objects for which consuls are deputed by their sovereigns. Ibid.

As an abstract question, it is difficult to understand on what ground a state can claim jurisdiction of civil suits against consuls. By the constitution, the judicial power of the courts of the United States, extends to all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls, exclusive of the courts of the several states, and the judiciary act gives the district courts jurisdiction of all suits against consuls and vice consuls, except for certain offences enumerated in the act. Davis v. Packard, 7 Peters, 276.

Consuls are subject to indictment for misdemeanor in the courts of the United States. United States v. Ravara, 2 Dall. 297.

A consul is not personally answerable for a contract made in his official capacity on account of his government. Jones v. Le Tombe, 3 Dall. 381.

The advice of an American consul in a foreign port, gives to the master of a vessel no justification for an illegal act. Wilson v. The Mary, Gilpin's D. C. R. 31.

A consul's certificate of any fact is not evidence between third persons, unless expressly or impliedly made so by statute. Levy v. Burley, 2 Sumner's C. C. R. 355.

Under the consular act of 1803, the penalty of 500 dollars for not depositing the ship's register with the consul, on arrival at a foreign port, must be sued for within two years, the limitation prescribed by the act of 1790; it not being a revenue law within the meaning of the act of 1804. Parsons v. Hunter, % Summer's C. Ć. R. 419.

transmit ance to the

And for the direction of the consuls and vice-consuls of the United States in certain cases.

Sec. 2. Be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That they shall Right of Con. have right in the ports or places to which they are or may be seve- suls and Vice

Consuls, rally appointed of receiving the protests or declarations, which such captains, masters, crews, passengers and merchants, as are citizens of the United States may respectively choose to make there; and also such as any foreigner may choose to make before them relative to the personal interest of any citizens of the United States; and the copies of the said acts duly authenticated by the said consuls or vice-consuls, under the seal of their consulates, respectively, shall receive faith in law, equally as their originals would in all courts in the United States. It shall be their duty where the laws of the country permit, to take possession of the personal estate left by any citizen of the United States, other to take charge of than seamen belonging to any ship or vessel who shall die within their personal estates

of deceased per. consulate; leaving there no legal representative, partner in trade or

sons, &c. trustee by him appointed to take care of his effects, they shall inventory the same with the assistance of two merchants of the United States, or for want of them, of any others at their choice; shall collect the debts

To collect due to the deceased in the country where he died, and pay the debts debts, &c. and due from his estate which he shall have there contracted; shall sell at

balauction after reasonable public notice such part of the estate as shall be Treasury of the of a perishable nature and such further part, if any, as shall be necessary v. s, if not for the payment of his debts, and at the expiration of one year from his called for by

legal represen. decease, the residue; and the balance of the estate they shall transmit

tative. to the treasury of the United States, to be holden in trust for the legal claimants. But if at any time before such transmission, the legal representative of the deceased shall appear and demand his effects in their hands, they shall deliver them up, being paid their fees, and shall cease their proceedings.

For the information of the representative of the deceased, it shall be Consul to nothe duty of the consul or vice-consul authorized to proceed as aforesaid tify the death in in the settlement of his estate, immediately to notify his death in one a gazette pub.

lished in the of the gazettes published in the consulate, and also to the Secretary of consulate. State, that the same may be notified in the state to which the deceased shall belong; and he shall also, as soon as may be, transmit to the Secretary of State, an inventory of the effects of the deceased taken as before directed.

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the said consuls and vice- Duty as consuls, in cases where ships or vessels of the United States shall be stranded

sels. stranded on the coasts of their consulates respectively, shall, as far as the laws of the country will permit, take proper measures, as well for the purpose of saving the said ships or vessels, their cargoes and appurtenances, as for storing and securing the effects and merchandise saved, and for taking an inventory or inventories thereof; and the merchandise and effects saved with the inventory or inventories thereof taken as aforesaid, shall, after deducting therefrom the expense, be delivered to the owner or owners. Provided, That no consul or vice-consul shall have authority to take possession of any such goods, wares, merchandise or other property, when the master, owner or consignee thereof is present or capable of taking possession of the same.

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for every consul and vice-consul of the United States, to take and receive the following fees of office for the services which he shall have performed.

For authenticating under the consular seal, every protest, declaration, deposition, or other act, which such captains, masters, mariners, seamen, passengers, merchants or others as are citizens of the United States may respectively choose to make, the sum of two dollars.

to vee.

Fees.

For the taking into possession, inventorying, selling and finally settling and paying, or transmitting as aforesaid, the balance due on the personal estate left by any citizen of the United States who shall die within the limits of his consulate, five per centum on the gross amount of such estate.

For taking into possession and otherwise proceeding on any such estate which shall be delivered over to the legal representative before a final settlement of the same, as is herein before directed, two and an half per centum on such part delivered over as shall not be in money, and

five per centum on the gross amount of the residue. Consuls to re- And it shall be the duty of the consuls and vice-consuls of the United ceipt for them.

States, to give receipts for all fees which they shall receive by virtue of

this act, expressing the particular services for which they are paid. President au. Sec. 5. And be it further inacted, That in case it be found necessary thorized to grant for the interest of the United States, that a consul or consuls be appointed suls in Barbary. to reside on the coast of Barbary, the President be authorized to allow 1797, ch. 12. an annual salary, not exceeding two thousand dollars to each person so

to be appointed : Provided, That such salary be not allowed to more

than one consul for any one of the states on the said coast. Consuls to Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That every consul and vice-consul give bond with sureties to be

shall, before they enter on the execution of their trusts, or if already in approved by the the execution of the same, within one year from the passing of this act, Secretary of or if resident in Asia, within two years, give bond with such sureties as State;

shall be approved by the Secretary of State, in a sum of not less than two thousand nor more than ten thousand dollars, conditioned for the true and faithful discharge of the duties of his office according to law,

and also for truly accounting for all monies, goods and effects which where

to be may come into his possession by virtue of this act: and the said bond lodged. shall be lodged in the office of the Secretary of the Treasury.

Provision for Sec. 7. And be it further enacted, That to prevent the mariners and mariners left in foreign ports.

seamen, employed in vessels belonging to citizens of the United States, Repealed by in cases of shipwreck, sickness or captivity, from suffering in foreign the fifth section ports, it shall be the duty of the consuls and vice-consuls respectively, Feb. 28, 1803.

from time to time to provide for them in the most reasonable manner, at the expense of the United States, subject to such instructions as the Secretary of State shall give, and not exceeding an allowance of twelve cents to a man per diem; and all masters and commanders of vessels belonging to citizens of the United States, and bound to some port of the same, are hereby required and enjoined to take such mariners or seamen on board of their ships or vessels, at the request of the said consuls or vice-consuls respectively, and to transport them to the port, in the United States to which such ships or vessels may be bound free of costs or charge; but that the said mariners or seamen shall

, if able, be bound to do duty on board such ships or vessels according to their several abilities: Provided, That no master or captain of any ship or vessel, shall be obliged to take a greater number than two men to every one hundred tons burthen of the said ship or vessel, on any one voyage: and if any such captain or master shall refuse the same on the request or order of the consul or vice-consul, such captain or master shall forfeit and pay the sum of thirty dollars for each mariner or seaman so refused, to be recovered for the benefit of the United States by the said consul or vice-consul in his own name, in any court of competent juris

diction. Duty of mas. Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That where a ship or vessel belongrespecting dis ing to citizens of the United States is sold in a foreign port or place, charged seamen the master, unless the crew are liable by their contract or do consent to and of Consuls be discharged there, shall send them back to the state where they neglecting it. Repealed by

entered on board, or furnish them with means sufficient for their return, the 5th section to be ascertained by the consul or vice-consul of the United States,

of the Act of

having jurisdiction of the port or place.

And in case of the master's of the Act of refusal, the said consul or vice-consul may (if the laws of the land per- Feb. 28, 1803. mit it) cause his ship, goods and person to be arrested and held until he shall comply with his duty herein.

Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That the specification of certain Powers de powers and duties, in this act, to be exercised or performed by the con

fined. suls and vice-consuls of the United States, shall not be construed to the exclusion of others resulting from the nature of their appointments, or any treaty or convention under which they may act.

APPROVED, April 14, 1792.

STATUTE I.

Chap.XXV.-An Act authorizing the grant and conveyance of certain Lands to April 21, 1792.

the Ohio Company of Associates. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa

Certain tract

. tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That a ed for in 1789 certain contract expressed in an indenture executed on the twentyseventh day of October, in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, between the then board of treasury for the United States of America, of the one part, and Manasseh Cutler, and Winthrop Sergeant, as agents for the directors of the Ohio Company of Associates, of the other part, so far as the same respects the following described tract of land; that is to say : “Beginning at a station where the western boundary line of the seventh range of townships, laid out by the authority of the United States in Congress assembled, intersects the river Ohio; thence extending along that river south-westerly to a place where the western boundary line of the fifteenth range of townships, when laid out agreeably to the land ordinance passed the twentieth day of May, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, would touch the said river; thence running northerly on the said western bounds of the said fifteenth range of townships, 'till a line drawn due east to the western boundary line of the said seventh range of townships, will comprehend, with the other lines of this tract, seven hundred and fifty thousand acres of land, besides the several lots and parcels of land in the said contract reserved or appropriated to particular purposes; thence running east to the western boundary line of the said seventh range of townships, and thence along the said line to the place of beginning," be and the same is hereby confirmed: And that the President of the confirmed, and United States be and he hereby is authorized and empowered to issue President of the letters patent in the name and under the seal of the United States, grant letters pathereby granting and conveying to Rufus Putnam, Manasseh Cutler, tent in the name Robert Oliver, and Griffin Green, and to their heirs and assigns, in fee of Rufus Putsimple, the said described tract of land, with the reservations in the said indenture expressed, in trust for the persons composing the said Ohio company of associates, according to their several rights and interests, and for their heirs and assigns, as tenants in common.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the President be and he To grant one hereby is further anthorized and empowered, by letters patent as afore

Rufus Putnam, said, to grant and convey to the said Rufus Putnam, Manasseh Cutler, &c. Robert Oliver and Griffin Green, and to their heirs and assigns, in trust, for the uses above expressed, one other tract of two hundred and fourteen thousand, two hundred and eighty-five acres of land. Provided, on certain conThat the said Rufus Putnam, Manasseh Cutler, Robert Oliver and ditions. Griffin Green, or either of them, shall deliver to the Secretary of the Treasury within six months, warrants which issued for army bounty. rights sufficient for that purpose, according to the provision of a resolve of Congress of the twenty-third day of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven. Vol. I.-33

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To grant one Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the President be and he other tract to

hereby is further authorized and empowered by letters patent as afore-
Rufus Putnam,
and others. said, to grant and convey to the said Rufus Putnam, Manasseh Cutler,

Robert Oliver and Griffin Green, and to their heirs and assigns, in fee
simple, in trust for the uses above expressed, a farther quantity of one

hundred thousand acres of land. Provided always nevertheless, That On an express the said grant of one hundred thousand acres shall be made on the condition,

express condition of becoming void, for such part thereof, as the said
company shall not have, within five years from the passing of this act,
conveyed in fee simple, as a bounty and free of expense, in tracts of
one hundred acres, to each male person, not less than eighteen years of

age, being an actual settler at the time of such conveyance. Where to be

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the said quantities of two located. hundred and fourteen thousand, two hundred and eighty-five acres, and

of one hundred thousand acres, shall be located within the limits of the
tract of one million, five hundred thousand acres of land, described in
the indenture aforesaid, and adjoining to the tract of land described in
the first section of this act, and in such form as the President in the
letters patent, shall prescribe for that purpose.

APPROVED, April 21, 1792.
STATUTE I.
April 27, 1792. CHAP. XXVI.-An Act to indemnify the Estate of the late Major General Nathan-

iel Green, for a certain bond entered into by him during the late war.
Estate of the Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
late General
Green indemni.

United States of America in Congress assembled, That the United States fied for amount shall and will indemnify the estate of the late General Green, for the of a certain sum of eight thousand six hundred and eighty-eight pounds six shillings bond,

sterling money, being the amount due on the first day of May, one thou-
sand seven hundred and eighty-six, on a certain bond executed to Mes-
sieurs Newcomen and Collet, by the said General Green, as surety for
John Banks and Company, and the interest thereon; excepting there-
from a certain conditional bond given in June one thousand seven hun-
dred and eighty-six, for about one thousand six hundred pounds sterling,
(be the same more or less) being part of the aforesaid sum of eight thou-

sand six hundred and eighty-eight pounds six shillings, which was to be on certain con- paid, only in case the said General Green should recover from the said ditions, Banks, or Banks and Company, a sum sufficient for his indemnity;

Provided it shall appear upon due investigation, by the officers of the
treasury, that the said General Green, in his lifetime, or his executors,
since his decease, have not been already indemnified, or compensated
for the said sum of eight thousand six hundred and eighty-eight pounds
six shillings, except as aforesaid: And also provided, That the said ex-
ecutors shall account for a sum being about two thousand pounds ster-
ling, (be the same more or less) recovered of John Ferrie, one of the
partners of the said Banks and Company, by the said executors, to be
in part of the indemnification aforesaid; and also shall make over to the
Comptroller of the Treasury and his successors, for the United States,
all mortgages, bonds, covenants, or other counter securities whatsoever,
now due, which were obtained by the said General Green, in his life-
time, from the said Banks and Company, on account of his being surety

for them as aforesaid, to be sued for in the name of the said executors duty of the for the use of the United States. And the officers of the treasury are officers of the

hereby authorized to liquidate and settle the sum due to the estate of
Treasury here-
in.

the said General Green, to indemnify the same, as aforesaid, according
to the true intent and meaning of this act, and to pay the same, out of
the treasury of the United States, to the said executors, to be account-
ed for by them, as part of the said estate.

APPROVED, April 27, 1792.

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