A Social History of the American Negro

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Cosimo, Inc., 01.12.2005 - 440 Seiten
Immediately after the war legislation enacted in the South made severe provision with reference to vagrancy. Negroes were arrested on the slightest pretexts and their labor as that of convicts leased to landowners or other business men. When, a few years later, Negroes, dissatisfied with the returns from their labor on the farms, began a movement to the cities, there arose a tendency to make the vagrancy legislation still more harsh, so that at last a man could not stop work without technically committing a crime. Thus in all its hideousness developed the convict lease system. -from "The Negro in the New South" This 1921 volume offers a new examination of the history of black people in America in light of the new flowering of cultural interest-on the part of whites as well as blacks-in the post-World War I period. A highly readable and tremendously informative foundational overview of the grand and terrible story of Africans in the New World, this work explores: .the role of the Negro in the Spanish exploration of America .the development of the slave trade .the difficult social positions of the Indian, the mulatto, and the free Negro .early slave insurrections .the Negro in the American Revolution .first steps toward abolition .Negroes in the West .the impact of Nat Turner and the Amistad case .Sojourner Truth and the influence of the women's suffrage movement .the Civil War and Emancipation .the problems of enfranchisement .Mob violence and election troubles at the turn of the 20th century .Negro migration around America .the place of the Negro in American life .and much more. African-American author and educator BENJAMIN GRIFFITH BRAWLEY (1882-1939) wrote extensively on blackculture, including Women of Achievement (1919).

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Inhalt

I
1
II
21
III
48
IV
76
V
91
VI
116
VII
132
VIII
155
X
213
XI
238
XII
252
XIII
262
XIV
287
XV
297
XVI
341
XVII
372

IX
172

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Seite 222 - I -will be as harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject, I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation.
Seite 254 - ... the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit : Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the parishes of St.
Seite 50 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other.
Seite 254 - Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and Government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion...
Seite 170 - And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman?
Seite 231 - Once to every man and nation comes the moment to decide, In the strife of truth with falsehood, for the good or evil side; Some great cause, God's New Messiah, offering each the bloom or blight, Parts the goats upon the left hand and the sheep upon the right; And the choice goes by forever 'twixt that darkness and that light.
Seite 168 - The history of mankind is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her.
Seite 288 - We remember with what fidelity for four years he guarded our defenseless women and children, whose husbands and fathers were fighting against his freedom. To his eternal credit be it said that whenever he struck a blow for his own liberty he fought in open battle, and when at last he raised his black and humble hands that the shackles might be struck off, those hands were innocent of wrong against his helpless charges, and worthy to be taken in loving grasp by every man who honors loyalty and devotion.
Seite 365 - If we must die, let it not be like hogs Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot, While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs, Making their mock at our accursed lot. If we must die...

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