The works of ... Joseph Addison, collected by mr. Tickell

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Página 439 - Whosoever . therefore shall confess Me before men, him will I confess also before My Father which is in heaven. But whosoever shall deny Me before men, him will I also deny before My Father which is in heaven.
Página 2 - Statesman, yet friend to truth ; of soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honour clear ; Who broke no promise, serv'd no private end, Who ga'in'd no title, and who lost no friend ; Ennobled by himself, by all approv'd, And prais'd, unenvied, by the Muse he lov'd.
Página 32 - The man resolv'd, and steady to his trust, Inflexible to ill, and obstinately just, May the rude rabble's insolence despise, Their senseless clamours and tumultuous cries : The tyrant's fierceness he beguiles. And the stern brow, and the harsh voice defies, And with superior greatness smiles.
Página 258 - Bajan mole, Rais'd on the seas, the surges to control — At once comes tumbling down the rocky wall; Prone to the deep, the stones disjointed fall Of the vast pile; the scatter'd ocean flies; Black sands...
Página 95 - For they that led us away captive, required of us then a song, and melody in our heaviness : Sing us one of the songs of Sion. 4 How shall we sing the LORD'S song in a strange land?
Página 190 - ... this nation. The English and French, who always use the same words in verse as in ordinary conversation, are forced to raise their language with metaphors and figures, or, by the pompousness of the whole phrase, to wear off any littleness that appears in the particular parts that compose it. This makes our blank verse, where there is no rhyme to support the expression, extremely difficult to...
Página 452 - Georgics; where we receive more strong and lively ideas of things from his words, than we could have done from the objects themselves; and find our imaginations more affected by his descriptions, than they would have been by the very sight of what he describes.
Página 303 - When a man sees the prodigious pains and expence that our fore- fathers have been at in these barbarous buildings, one cannot but fancy to himself what miracles of architecture they would have left us, had they only been instructed in the right way...
Página 153 - Vain fool, and coward!" said the lofty maid, " Caught in the train, which thou thyself hast laid ! On others practise thy Ligurian arts : Thin stratagems, and tricks of little hearts, Are lost on me: nor shalt thou safe retire, With vaunting lies to thy fallacious sire.
Página 71 - The coat of arms by proud Mezentius worn, Now on a naked snag in triumph borne, Was hung on high, and glitter'd from afar, A trophy sacred to the God of War. Above his arms, fix'd on the leafless wood, Appear'd his plumy crest, besmear'd with blood...

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