Scenes and Incidents in the Western Prairies: During Eight Expeditions, and Including a Residence of Nearly Nine Years in Northern Mexico, Volumes 1-2

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J. W. Moore, 1857
 

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Página 66 - He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men, which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public.
Página 267 - The examination of this subject requires that it should be stript of all those accessory topics which adhere to it in the common opinion of men. The existence of a God, and a future state of rewards and punishments, are totally foreign to the subject.
Página 111 - Each wagoner must tie a brand new cracker to the lash of his whip; for on driving through the streets and the plaza publica every one strives to outvie his comrades in the dexterity with which he flourishes this favorite badge of his authority. Our wagons were soon discharged in the ware-rooms of the custom house; and a few days...
Página 144 - ... highways traversing scattered settlements which are interspersed with corn-fields nearly sufficient to supply the inhabitants with grain. The only attempt at anything like architectural compactness and precision, consists in four tiers of buildings, whose fronts are shaded with a fringe of -portales or corredores of the rudest possible description. They stand around the public square...
Página 52 - All's set!" is finally heard from some teamster — "All's set," is directly responded from every quarter. "Stretch out!" immediately vociferates the captain. Then, the 'heps ! ' of drivers — the cracking of whips — the trampling of feet — the occasional creak of wheels — the rumbling of wagons — form a new scene of exquisite confusion, which I shall not attempt further to describe.
Página 43 - ... supply their place ; the spirit of class does not descend to him, or rather, he is far above it ; his altered state suggests comparatively few enjoyments or comforts in which his old associates cannot participate ; and thus the Connors...
Página 148 - These severe winds are very prevalent upon the great western prairies, though they are seldom quite so inclement. At some seasons they are about as regular and unceasing as the trade winds of the ocean. It will often blow a gale for days and even weeks together without slacking for a moment, except occasionally at night. It is for this reason, as well as on account of the rains, that percussion guns are preferable upon the prairies, particularly for those who understand their use. The winds are frequently...
Página 143 - Francis), the latter being the patron, or tutelary saint. Like most of the towns in this section of country it occupies the site of an ancient Pueblo or Indian village, whose race has been extinct for a great many years. Its situation is twelve or fifteen miles east of the Rio del Norte, at the western base of a snow-clad mountain, upon a beautiful stream of small mill-power size, which ripples down in icy cascades, and joins the river some twenty miles to the southwestward. The population of the...
Página 106 - nearest waters of the legitimate ' Red River of Natchitoches,' are still a hundred miles to the south of this road. In descending to the Rio Colorado, we met a dozen or more of our countrymen from Taos, to which town (sixty or seventy miles distant) there is a direct but rugged route across the mountains. It was a joyous encounter, for among them we found some of our old acquaintances whom we had not seen for many years. During our boyhood we had ' spelt' together in the same country school, and...
Página 54 - ... hiding-place, and moved on silently and slowly until they found themselves beyond the purlieus of the Indian camps. Often did they look back in the direction where from three to five hundred savages were supposed to watch their movements, but, much to their astonishment, no one appeared to be in pursuit. The Indians, believing no doubt that the property of the traders would come into their hands, and having no amateur predilection for taking scalps at the risk of losing their own, appeared willing...

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