Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

xyi

PRINCIPAL AUTHORITIES CITED IN THIS WORK.

Plutarch : Lives ; Morals.
Porphyry.
Poseidonius.

Quincey, Thomas de : Confessions

of an English Opium Eater.

Rabelais, Francis : Life of Gar.

gantua and of Pantagruel. Raphael : Royal Book of Dreams. Reid, Thomas : Letter to Rev.

William Gregory. Richter, Jean Paul F.: Dream upon

the Universe.

on

Schiller, J. C. F.: Piccolomini;

Death of Wallenstein.
Scots Magazine.
Scott, Sir Walter: Letters

Squire, Archdeacon: Case of Henry

Axford.
Stewart, Dugald: Collected Works.
Strabo.
Suetonius : Lives of the Cæsars.
Suidas.
Synesius.
Swedenborg, Emanuel.
Swift, Dean: On Dreams.

Talbot, Hon. Mr.
Tertullian.
Testaments, Old and New.
Townley, Miss.

Universal Magazine.
Upham, Thomas C.: Life and

Religious Opinions of Madame
de la Mothe Guyon.

Vinsauf, Geoffrey de: Itinerary of

Richard I. and others to the Holy
Land.

Demonology and Witchcraft.
Shakespeare, William : Romeo and

Juliet; Richard the Third. Sheppard, John : On Dreams in

their Mental and Moral Aspects. Sifat-i-Sirozah. Sigourney, Mrs. : Pocahontas, and

other Poems.
Smellie, William : Philosophy of

Natural History.
Socrates.
Sophocles : Electra.
Southcott, Joanna: Letters and

Communications.
Sozomen : Ecclesiastical History.
Spectator.
Spenser, Edmund : The Faerie

Queene.
Spurzheim, Johann Caspar: Out-
lines of the Physiognomical
System of Drs. Gall and Spurz-
heim.

Walton, Izaak: Life of Sir Henry

Wotton.
Watts, Isaac; Philosophical Essays.
William of Malmesbury,
Wilson, Dr.: The Pársí Religion,

as contained in the Zand-Avastá.

Xenophon: Anabasis ; Cyropædia.

Young, Edward: Night-Thoughts

on Life, Death, and Immortality.

Zartasht-Behram : Zartusht-Na

mah, or Life of Zoroaster. Zeno.

Part X.

ON DREAMS.

ON

DREAMS.

CHAPTER I.

PLACE OF DREAMS IN SYSTEMS OF DIVINATION.

THERE is, perhaps, in human nature no instinct more characteristically human than that which shrinks from isolation. The old physical formula to the effect that nature abhors a vacuum, might, by the easiest of transitions, be capable of a civil adaptation. Every one, from Adam to Campbell's Last Man, with Cowper's Alexander Selkirk for a middle term,Timon of Athens only excepted, and he questionably-rather than be alone in a depopulated world, would endure to live in a society to which he was bound only by the ties of a universal antipathy. Even on the amiable hypothesis that man is a beast of prey, it is evident that it is necessary for him to be within reach of his quarry: that he must be gregarious, if only in fulfilment of his tendencies to predacity. Such a supposition enables us to state the case in the strongest possible manner ; for if a social attraction even of antagonism be admitted, there is no difficulty in establishing an à fortiori argument whenever the attraction of cohesion is agitated,—whenever, that is, regard is had to man from the brighter and softer side of his character and disposition.

But amongst the necessities of man's nature, there is that

4

GRAVITATION TO THE INFINITE.

of still another fellowship. He may be gregarious; but he is the object of longings which cannot be appeased by the sympathy, or indeed by the society, if that were possible, of the aggregate of the race. His social life may be satisfactory; his relations to his kindred and his fellow-citizens may be kindly and complete; but amidst social and family completeness and satisfaction, he is conscious, by reason of his proper will and personality, of a magnificent loneliness. There are one or two important senses in which every man is the only man in the universe. Each is cut off from his kind, while still in their midst, as ship is severed from ship in mid-ocean; or as an insular star that, across the unphenomenal wastes of space, remotely twinkles to its fellows. Yet, as the orbs of heaven gravitate in their motions towards the central and dominant lord of their system, so does man gravitate, not only towards something of kin to himself or greater than himself, but towards something which is infinitely inclusive of himself and all his

peers. There is, then, in man an attraction to the mysterious and the comprehensive which could not be satisfied even if, in the fruition of a sublime incontinence, he throbbed with every heart, swelled with every wave, or shared the tiny pulsations of every leaf. · Man,” says Protagoras, " is the measure of the universe;" and this boast is half a truth, for man is a little greater than anything or everything in the material world that he can imagine. He chafes at every hypothetical limitation. The universe in its entirety may be beyond him ; but he knows that he can penetrate beyond every conceivable part thereof. And for the rest, whilst in the sphere of extension he is forced to introduce negations into his vocabulary, and to confess the Indefinite, the Boundless, the Infinite-in the sphere of morals and ontology he can still find affirmative vocables, and call the Infinite by the determinate names of the Self-existent, the Creator, the Disposer, the Good.

Nothing less than a felt if inexplicable relation to this Being, whom he can realize if not understand-apprehend if

[ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »