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If the Gentleman who has favoured us with the Groves of Peace will send the continuation of it, and some of the other promised pieces, we shall not fail to pay them every attention which their inerits deserve.

J. R. on Gratitude will not be inserted.
W. S. will find the Solution of the Geometrical Query in our last.

J. M. Pulney-A Friend-R.--N. T. S.-S. W. x. Y.-and Philachæus, are received.

Dina XILOTATOS--S. W. X. 2.- Piso_J. N.-S.--Gent's Monody, and P. G.'s Elegiac Slanzos, on the Death of the Right Hon. R. B. Sheridan, in our next.

Å. B. C.-H. T, and several other communications, as soon as possible.

John Bull's Borl of Punch not being properly mixed—The Adventurer with « his tale" -Generous - Anlegunrius-H.--G- $_Eumela-Farewell Juvenalis, from its personality-and the Observations on Major Dali's Essays, are inadmissible.

We must again remind our Poetical Correspondents, and which they will have the goodness to observe, that when we take no direct notice of their communications, it is a tacit mode of declining them.

ERRATA.- In the enumeration of Mr. SHERIDAN's dramatic pieces, in our last Num. ber, the “ School for Scandal” was by mistake omitted, from the circumstance of that Comedy never having been printed with the name of its author, and consequently onacknowledged as a literary production.- -Page 24, col. 2, line 11, for Sertiaries, read Tertiaries; page 25, last line, for valve, read value.

STATE OF Tib BRITISH NAVAL FORCE ON THE IST OF AUGUST

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Downs
Leith Station
Baltic
English Channel and Coast of France
Irislı Station :
Jersey, Guernsey, &c.
Spain, Portugal, and Gibraltar
Mediterranean and on Passage
Coast of Africa .
N. America, Halifax, Newfoundland, &c.

18
I Leeward Islands
West Indies
Jamaica, &c.

S
Brazil Station
Cape of Good Hope
East Indies and on Passage-

8
TOTAL AT SEA

10 5

98

7 1S9 In Port and Fitting

10

18

74 Guard Ships : Hospital and Prison Ships

0 TOTAL IN COMMISSION

25 10

56

10 Ordinary and repairing for Service 198 10 99

375 Building

SO GRAND TOTALS.

179 so 159 126

144 $ VARIATIONS OF BAROMBTER, THERMOMETER,&e, at Nine o'clock A.dl.

By T. BLUNT, Mathematical Instrument Maker to his Majesty, No. 22, CORNHILL,

1816 Barom Ther. Wind Obser. 1816Barom Ther. W'ind Obser. July26 29 86 62 NW Fair Aug. 11/30.01

S Rain 27 29.93 | 64 W Ditto

12 30.05 63 SW Ditto 28 29.84 62 N Ditto

13 29.99 63 W Fair 29 29.63 65 E Ditto 14 29.75 61

S Ditto 30 29.45 56 SW Ditto

15 29.46 62. SW Rain 31 29.35 53 N Ditto

1 6 29.54. 63 W Ditto Aug. 1 20.53 | 54 W Ditto

17 29 80 61 SW Fair 2/ 29.80 63 S Rain

18 29.99 61 NW

Ditto 8 29.83 64 W |Fair

19 30.19 60

N Ditto 4 29.87 63 SW Ditto

20 30.1063 N

Rain 5) 2978 65 W Ditto

21 30.20 52

N Fair 6| 29.95 64 W Ditto

22 30 16 58 N Dillo 7 29.96 62 SW

Rain

23 30.14 63 NW Dillo 8 29.74 67 SW Fair 24 30.13 62 NE

Ditto 91 29.69 63 SW Ditto

25 30.20 56

N Ditto 10! 29.97 65 SW Ditto

261 30.22 60

E IDitto

64

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EUROPEAN MAGAZINE,

AND

LONDON REVIEW,

FOR AUGUST, 1816.

MEMOIR OF

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE EDWARD LAW, LORD ELLENBOROUGH, LORD CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE KING'S BENCH, AN OFFICIAL TRUSTEE OF TRE BRITISH

MUSEUM, GOVERNOR OF THE CHARTER-HOUSE, ETC. ETC. ETC. (WITI A PORTRAIT, ENGRAVED T. BLOOD,

FROM AN ORIGINAL PAINTING
BY SAMUEL DRUM ND, ESQ. A.R.A.]
High Emulation hath a thousand sons,
That one by one pursue.

SAAKSPEARE,
TIXAMPLES of superior genius, and After he had taken his bachelor's de-

BY

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are not in any kingdom less rare, than a student of Lincolu's-inn, but was not, in our highly-favoured England ; and however, called at the usual standing, the pen of Biography is never more choosing to practise for a longer period pleasingly, nor perhaps more benefi- under the bar. Lawyers in this situation cially engaged, than in recording their are not allowed to appear in the characprogress, when aided by emulation, and ter of advocates :- they assist in drawadvanced by perseverance. Sedulous ing up written pleadings, whence they exertion is in itself most honourable are called special pleaders ; but the fees to the mental powers, and indicates a they receive are much less than those certain superior manliness of feeling, given to gentlemen who have been adwhich, in whatever science it is en- initted to the bar : but the advantage ployed, must augment the sum of pub. attending this plan are.-- practice at an Tic utility, and command respect ; but early period, and the opportunities afwhen talent forms the basis of its super- forded of forming useful and eligible structure, and that glowing ambition connections with clients – Of the profits which grasps at every attainable ex- attending it, the reader will not forni cellence urges the student forward to a very high idea, from the following his destined eminence ;-every move

anecdote. -A late Altorney general, at ment becomes interesting,,we retrace a consultation, after discussing the subthe progress of his elevation with a new ject before them, in his usual high and delight,--and add to the tribute of decisive tone, concluded with saying, respect,—the homage of admiration. “ And, gentlemen, this is my opinion."

-- A solicitor present, who had the highLORD ELLENBOROUGH is a na- est respect for the talents of the speaker, tive of the county of Cumberland, and - but was roused by his peremptory was son of Dr. EDMUND Law, the late and authoritative manner, -observed, Bishop of Carlisle. He was educated " It is your opinion-and I remeinber until he arrived at the age of twelve when I could bave had that opinion years by his uncle, the Rev. Hemphry for five shillings !". (alluding to the Christian, who resided at Bottsam, near time when be practised under the bar). Cambridge, and was then sent to the - To which the Attorney-general goodCharter-house ; from whence here. humouredly replied, “And probably, moved, in 1768, to St. Peter's College, at that time, my opinion was not worth Cambridge, of wbich bis father had been five shillings." appointed Master in 1756.

After being called to the bar, Ma

bar;

Law selected the northern circuit for bis which he made in a difficult inmirance debut, most probably oo account of the cause, when his practice was not yet advantages of patronage and connection very considerable, drew upon him uniwhich he expected to derive from the 'versal attention, and ranked bim among infuence of his father, the Bishop of the first pleaders, at-the bar. The subCARLISLE. At this period, the principal ject was one to which he had always causes were in the bands of Messrs. paid particular attention, and in which Wallace and Lee, men so distinguished, he shone with the most distinguished that the junior lawyers could aspire to superiority. The impression produced practice only after they had declined his management of this business it. Among the younger counsel then, brought him immediately a vast acwere, Lord Auckland, Lord Eldon, cession of business at Guildhall, and and Lord Alvanley. Lord Auckland may be considered, in a great degree, goon abdicated the profession of the the foundation of his present grealness law for politics ; Lord Alvanley was and deserved good fortune. induced by the prospect of greater ad- His reputation was yet farlber esvantage to remove to the Chancery tended by the very active part he took

while Lord Eldon and Lord Ellen- in the defence of Governor Hasting. borough remained to divide between into this trial he was introduced by them the rich harvest of that field, Sir Thomas Rumbold, who married his which the advancement of their great sister. The cause had been offered to predecessors soon left open Lo their cul. Lord Erskine, who refused it on activation.

count of the many unpleasant circumBusiness in the country naturally leads stances in which it appeared likely to to business in London; and Mr. Law was involve him. This refusal was, bow. 'not witbout friends who assisted him on ever, judged unprofessional, and could this more important theatre ; among have been ventured upou only by a whom, the earliest and most useful was man of his established celebrity. That the late Judge Buller.

it originated from considerations such In the Chief Justice Willes, Mr. Law as we have mentioned, and not from any also found another distinguished pa- conviction unfavourable to the charactron; but he was not a wan of great ter of the client, is evident from his depowers, and most probably derived froin fence of Stockdale, who was indicted for the abilities, and industry of his young a libel on the prosecutors of Hastings, friead, advantages fully equal to those as in the course of this defence he enwhich were imparted by the counte- deavoured to refute all the charges which nance be bestowed on bim. Accord. were brought against the Governor-ge ingly, our young lawyer was sometimes neral of Bengal. The reasons, however, enıployed in bunting cases for the which determined Lord Erskine's refuJudges—if not in more important ser. sal, weighed as strongly with Lord vices and by the aid of Judge Buller Ellenborough, but did not induce him soon obtained the distinction of a silke to decline the cause. The most serious gown. To accept this honour is thought inconvenience arising to him from it a bold step in a junior practitioner, was, that it hurt bis busipess at Westas its wearer must lead in every cause. minster-hall. A counsel was not likely The distinction, therefore, excludes him to be retained whose presence at the on all occasions when men of superior trial could not be depended upon, and reputation are employed, who are not who might be called away at a ininute's king's counsel. He must lead, or rc- notice to attend the house. He bad main silent; if, therefore, he is inade likewise a new set of antagonists to quate to this duty, he does nothing contend with Fox, Borke, Adans, and is accordingly crushed under his and, worst of all, SHERIDAN, whose keen own bonours. Mr. Law, however, could and sarcastic wit could not be exercised have no reason to eotertain appreben. on a more sensitive temper. sons of this nature; be must have been But the crosses, fatigues, and vexaconfident in his own abilitics, and only tions, Mr. Law endured from this ensuitable opportunities were wanting to gagement were no doubt all amply comdisplay them.

pensated by its brilliant, addition to Å singularly able and learned defence his fame. His abilities became still

more widely known, and be was ac * For a Portrait and Memoir, vide Vol. cordiogly ranked by the opinion of LXIX. March, 1816.

the public, as well as by the judgments

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