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To the Senate of the United States Congress:

Your memorialists, the legislative assembly of the Territory of New Mexico most respectfully protest against the passage of that clause of the statehood bill now before your honorable body, providing that New Mexico and Arizona shall become one state under the name of Arizona or any other name. Not only have the two great political parties of the nation in their national platform repeatedly promised New Mexico and Arizona admission into the Union, as separate states, but the people of this territory relying on these promises, and knowing their cause to be just, have likewise in their political platforms expressed themselves as unalterably opposed to be coming united with Arizona as provided in the bill now pending before your honorable body.

It certainly cannot be seriously insisted that New Mexico after having been a territory of the United States for more than fifty years, during which time her people have been a law abiding people and most faithful and loyal to the general government, is not fitted to take upon herself the responsibilities of a state government. If extent of area, wealth, population, intelligence and educational progress are elements to be considered in the admission of a new state, then we submit that New Mexico is entitled to admission at once.

New Mexico is now fourth in area among all of the states and territories, and her population, 200,000 at the last census, was larger than that of thirty-one of the present fortyfive states at the time of their admission. The population of New Mexico is about one-ninth that of the average of all of the states, while Ohio had but one-eighth and Indiana but one-twentieth of the general average when admitted. Our taxable property has a value of more than two hundred million dollars. Our system of public schools, our numerous modern school buildings throughout the territory, are models well worthy the emulation of some of the states of the Union. Strikes, lockouts, and mob violence are unknown in our territory, and the administration of justice is certain, and therefore the courts have the confidence of the entire people.

There are some special reasons why our claims should be considered favorably by your honorable body. New Mexico during the civil war showed her devotion and loyalty to the general government by the great number of soldiers she furnished for the union army. In the recent war with Spain, New Mexico furnished more than one-half of the soldiers that constituted the famous rough rider regiment, commanded by Col. Theodore Roosevelt.

In the opinion of your memorialists, Arizona is not without her claims to separate statehood. In 1863, when that territory was taken from New Mexico, congress in the act establishing the territory, promised it statehood within its present boundaries.

A territorial form of government is not compatible with the interests of the people. Such a government is intolerable and obnoxious to the American citizen. A territorial government is only intended to endure up to the point where the people are ready to enter the Union as a state.

Such a government as ours in this territory is a denial of many of the substantial rights of the people living within the territory. It is an injustice to them to longer keep them in territorial bondage. With the entrance of this territory into the Union of states, our wealth will rapidly increase. Capital will find investments here, that is too timid to enter a territory. Our great mineral resources, including vast iron and coal deposits, copper, silver, gold, sulphur, and other extensive minerals will be rapidly developed, and in a few years, under a state government, enjoying civil liberty, we will be a prosperous people.

Therefore, be it Resolved, That the secretary of the territory be and he is hereby directed to transmit certified copies of this memorial to the president of the United States, to the honorable secretary of the interior, to the president of the United States senate, and to the members of the senate committee on territories; and the secretary of the territory is further directed to have printed 500 copies of this memorial and to mail a copy to each of the members of the two houses of congress.

JOINT MEMORIAL 2.

TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES PROTESTING

AGAINST THE CREATION OF THE RIO DE JEMEZ FOREST

RESERVE. C. J. M. No. 2; Approved February 4, 1905. Be it resolved, That the following joint memorial be adopted by the 36th legislative assembly of the Territory of New Mexico: To the President of the United States:

Your memorialists, of the 36th legislative assembly of the Territory of New Mexico, submit for your consideration this, its protest, on behalf of the people of the Territory of New Mexico, against the establishing of the Rio de Jemez forest reserve, which if established, would take in a large portion of the County of Rio Arriba and part of the County of Taos in said territory, and in that behalf respectfully represent.

That the said reserve has been established and set apart without the several thousands of people who live within the boundaries thereof and are mostly affected thereby, ever having any notice of the intent to establish it, and without being given any opportunity to protest against the same.

That the said reserve embraces a section of country almost as large or larger in area than the state of New Jersey, being ninety miles long and thirty miles wide, and including within its outer boundaries large tracts of land that are absolutely non-forest in character, and valuable only for mining, agricultural and grazing purposes, besides fifteen or more towns and villages and a large number of farms and stock ranches, as well as one of the most prominent mineral sections in the south-west, that is to say: The Bromide mining district, and also the Good Hope mining district. That embraces within its boundaries nearly two million acres of private land confirmed by the congress of the United States and the court of private land claims.

Your memorialists further represent that it fully appreciates the national economic value of proper forest reserves, but insists that in this particular case, because of the character of a large portion of the land embraced within it, the same does more injury than it can do good to the nation or to the Territory of New Mexico.

Your memorialists further represent that because of the rules and regulations governing forest reserves and the procurement of timber therefrom for mining purposes, that practically all of the mines in question will become greatly depreciated in value or worthless, because of the inability of their owners to work them under the restrictions governing the procurement of timber from this forest reserve.

Your memorialists further represent that New Mexico's chief industry is that of sheep raising and that the territory has within the last four years, advanced from the fourth to the first place in the nation as a wool producer, and that a large portion of the country so included in this forest reserve has been for nearly a half a century last past the principal grazing ground for a large number oi flocks of the territory and from which grazing ground all sheep will be thereby excluded, thus irreparably injuring the owners thereof as well as the territory at large.

That the establishing of this reserve practically amounts to the confiscation of all the ranches and homes, of the people living within the boundaries thereof, and although they established themselves there more than fifty years ago and endured the great hardships and risks in the accumulation of the property they possess, they are to be driven out to begin life anew. Moreover, the practical wiping out of the taxable value of this large amount of property will work irreparable injury to the counties of Taos and Rio Arriba, and the Territory of New Mexico.

Wherefore, your memorialists respectfully and earnestly pray that all that portion of the Rio de Jemez reserve that lies within Taos and Rio Arriba counties, may be restored to the public domain and consequent location and entry, relieving the people who will suffer thereby so much in consequence of the establishment of said reserve over such a large area of land of non-forest country: And

Be it Further Resolved, that the honorable secretary of the Territory of New Mexico transmit a certified copy of this joint memorial to the president of the United States.

JOINT MEMORIAL 3.

PROTESTING AGAINST THE PASSAGE, IN ITS PRESENT FORM,

BY THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES, OF H. R. 17939,
RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF A DAM AND RESER-
VOIR ON THE RIO GRANDE IN NEW MEXICO, AND FOR OTHER

PURPOSES. C. J. M. No. 3; Approved February 10, 1905. Whereas, it appears that there is now pending in the senate of the United States congress a bill designated as H. R. 17939, passed by the house of representatives of said congress, relating to the construction of a dam and reservoir on the Rio Grande in New Mexico, and for other purposes; and,

Whereas, it appears from the provisions of said bill that same establishes the priority of lands in New Mexico and Texas which have heretofore been actually irrigated for a considerable number of years in succession over lands in New Mexico (as well as in Texas) not so heretofore actually irrigated; and,

Whereas, the establishment of such a distinction by reason of such declared priorities would be detrimental to the development of that section of New Mexico referred to in said bill, and tend to retard settlement upon the public lands of the United States in said section, and is inimical to the best interests of the Territory of New Mexico; and,

Whereas, the bill in its present form is vague, ambiguous and uncertain as to the method provided therein for ascertaining the prior and vested water-rights therein mentioned.

Therefore your memorialist, the thirty-sixth legislative assembly of the Territory of New Mexico, believing and realizing that the said bill, in its present form, is subversive of the vested prior rights of the land owners within the section in New Mexico in said bill mentioned, and will cause great and interminable litigation, earnestly prays that said bill be not acted upon by the said senate of the United States until the duly accredited representatives of the Elephant Butte Water Users' Association of New Mexico have been given an opportunity to be heard by the senate committee having charge of said bill; and, further, that in no event shall said bill be passed in its present form.

JOINT MEMORIAL 4.

URGING THE GOVERNOR AND LEGISLATURE OF ILLINOIS TO

PETITION

THEIR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS TO

CONCUR IN THE PASSAGE OF THE STATEHOOD BILL GIVING

SEPARATE STATEHOOD TO NEW MEXICO.

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C. J. M. No. 4; Approved February 20, 1905. Whereas, the United States senate on the 7th inst., passed statehood bill, as amended, providing among other things for separate statehood for New Mexico, statehood in that form being what the people of New Mexico desire in preference to everything else and being for the welfare of New Mexico;

Therefore, the council and house of representatives of the legi:

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