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POLITICAL AND SATIRICAL POEMS.

POLITICAL AND SATIRICAL POEMS.

LINES ON THE DEATH OF MR. PERCEVAL.

In the dirge we sung o'er him no censure was heard,

Unembitter'd and free did the tear-drop descend; We forgot, in that hour, how the statesman had err'd,

And wept for the husband, the father, and friend.

Oh, proud was the meed his integrity won,

And gen'rous indeed were the tears that we shed, When, in grief, we forgot all the ill he had done, And, though wrong’d by him, living, bewail'd him,

when dead.

Even now, if one harsher emotion intrude,

"Tis to wish he had chosen some lowlier state, Had known what he was — and, content to be good,

Had ne'er, for our ruin, aspired to be great.

So, left through their own little orbit to move,

His years' might have rolld inoffensive away; His children might still have been bless'd with his

love, And England would ne'er have been cursed with

[his sway. To the Editor of the Morning Chronicle.

In order to explain the following Fragment, it is necessary to refer your readers to a late florid description of the Pavilion at Brighton, in the apartments of which, we are told, “FUM, The Chinese Bird of Royalty," is a principal ornament,

I am, Sir, yours, etc.

FUM AND HUM, THE TWO BIRDS OF ROYALTY.

One day the Chinese Bird of Royalty, FUM,
Thus accosted our own Bird of Royalty, HUM,
In that Palace or China-shop (Brighton, which is it?)
Where Fum had just come to pay Hum a short

visit. Near akin are these Birds, though they differ in

nation (The breed of the Hums is as old as creation); Both, full-craw'd Legitimates — both, birds of prey, Both, cackling and ravenous creatures, half way 'Twixt the goose and the vulture, like Lord CASTLE

REAGH. While Fum deals in Mandarins, Bonzes, Bohea, Peers, Bishops, and Punch, Hum, are sacred to thee!

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