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55 miles Set post, from which a sugar 24, N. 18 E. 12-sugar

18, S. 22 W. 38. Good farming land—beech, su

gar, oak, &c.

CONTINUED.

S. 87° 42' W.Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

34.00 Creek, 100. S.
56 miles Set post, from which a white ash 14, N. 14 W.30—elm

20, S. 31 E. 20. Land similar-W. d, bottom land.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory. 57 miles Set post, from which a white ash 6, N. 14 E. 5-ma

ple 12, S. 30 W. 13. Land very rich-rather wet -elm, maple, ash.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

35.00 Enter swamp.
58 miles Set post, from which a plum bush 6, N:2.08.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

55.00 Creek 50, S.
59 miles Set post, from which a sugar 18, S. 33 E. 16–elm 14,

N. 29 W.32. Land, second rate-beech, sugar, &c.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

50.00 Enter a swamp. 60 miles Set post, from which a maple 5 N. 8 W.29-w.oak 9,

S. 22 E. 40. Land, third rate.

CONTINUED,

S. 87 .42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

15.00 Passed swamp. 50.00 Brook 8, S. 61 miles Set post, from which a white ash 10, N. 1 E. 171–

white oak 30, S. 23 W. 19. Land, third rate.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

62 miles Set a post, from which a beech 14, S. 75W.26_beech

14, N. 80 E. 26. Oak, beech, ash-good farming land.

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S. 87° 42' W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

5.00 Enter swamp. 10.00 Passed it. 47.00 Creek 15, S. 62.00 Brook 8, S. E. 63 miles Set post, from which a beech 30, N. 30 W. 38–Iron

wood 6, S. 44 E. 141. Land, second rate-W.4, good for farming-beech, sugar, poplar.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

42.20 Enter prairie. 44.50 Passed it. 64 miles Set post between 2 rocks, from which a beech 10, N.

59 W.118. Land rich and good for farming-se cond rate.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

10.00 Enter Tamarack swamp. 30.00 Passed it. 37.00 Enter swamp. 50.00 Passed it. 65 miles Set post, from which a beech 5, S. 5 W. 7-sugar 24,

N. 69 W. 24. Land same-swamps excepted.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

40.00 \Brook, 8, S.
60.00 Creek, 80, S.
66 miles Set post, from which a becch 12, N. 43 E. 23-maple

30, S. 50 W. 2. Good farming land--part broken-
timber scarce.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory. 67 miles Beech 18, corner, from which, a white oak, 48, N. 37

W. 2. Land similar.

CONTINUED.

S. 87° 42' W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

55.00 Brock, 10, S. 72.00 Enter swamp. 74.00 Passed it. 68 miles Set post, from which a beech 24, N. 79 E. 28-iron

wood 8, S. 50 W. 61. Land, second rate-beech and sugar-good farming land.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

52.00 Brook, 15, S. 69 miles Set post, from which a beech 20, S. 56 W. 131-beech

18, N. 10 E. 41. Land same.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.
70 miles Set post, from which a bcech 12, N. 87 E. 22—white

ash 10, S. 75 W. 13. Land same.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory.

Set post, from which an elm 10, N.7 W. 50-elm 14, 71 miles E. 31. Land rich and good for farming-beech, su

gar, ash, elm.

Corner in a brook, 10, S. E.

CONTINUED.

S. 87 42 W. Between the State of Ohio and Michigan Territory. 33.92 To the N. W. corner of the Siate of Ohio. The cor

ner, a pile of stones, from which a bcech 14, N. 37 W.44–sugar 5, N.31 E. 15—sugar 9, S. 8 W.20. Land rich and good for farming.

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The foregoing is a true copy of the original Field Notes, on file in this office.

M. T. WILLIAMS, Sur. GEN. SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Cincinnati, 23d March, 1835. NOTE. The line of which the foregoing are the Field Notes, was ascertained and surveyed in the following manner: The Suvveyor determined by survey the most southerly point or extreme of Lake

Michigan, where he fixed a post, and made a number of observations for the latitude, the mean of which gave the latitude 41 deg. 38 min. 58 sec. As the.-e observations however were made with a common sextant, no great reliance can be placed upon their accuracy. From the point ascertained as the Southern exiremity of Lake Michigan, Mr. Harris (the Surveyor) ran a line due Eust, by the Compass, until it intersected a due North line, which he had previously run as the boundary between the States of Ohio and Indiana. On this East line, frequent celestial observations were inade to determine the variations of the Compass, and the course corrected accordingly. From the point of intersection of the East and North lines before mentioned, Mr. Harris continued a due North line twelve miles farther, and set a temporary post. This latter point from the most authentic maps then published, and the best information that could be obtained, was suppo sed to be upor. or near a direct line from the Southern extremity of Lake Michigan to the most Northerly Cape of Maumee Bay.

Commencing at the temporary post above mentioned, Mr. Harris run a random line on a course 84 deg. 42 min. E. which course he supposes would intersect, or pass near, ihe North Cape aforesaid. In this, however, he was 'mistaken. The random line struck the coast of Lake Erie 9 m. 76 chs. 75 lks, due North of the Northerly Cape of Maumee Bay (as ascertained by careful survey and measurement.) The line now run and measurements made, furnished Mr. Harris the data by which to calculate the course of a direct line from the North Cape to the southern extremity of Lake Michigan. This course he found to be S. 87 deg. 42 min. W. After establishing a post on the North Cape of Maumee Bay, and taking such bearings as were to be had, Mr. Harris commenced the survey and marking of a line on the course mentioned, and continued the same to the intersection of the due North line from the mouth of the Great Miami river; which intersection is 5 miles, 24 chains, 64 links North of the point of intersection of the East line from the Southern extreme of Lake Michigan with the said North line.

WASHINGTON, March 14th, 1835. Dear Sır: I have forborne writing to you, for the reason that I knew you were sufficiently well advised by our other friends of the opinions here in reference to the interesting subject of our Northern boundary, and for the additional reason, that their time was less occupied than mine.-Mr. Hamer has written to you to-day, and gives you the particulars of the interview which took place between the President, himself and myself this morning. Since that time I have met with the delegate, (Mr. Lyon) and Judge (Gen.) Duty of the Territory, and brought them to our quarters; (which ihey have just left) I endeavored to impress them with the belief that the mere running of the line, was no

direct assertion of jurisdiction, and not the proper place for them to break out. That when that was done, as done it would be, that it would be discretionary with the State, or yourself, whether you would push matters further, before the meeting of Congress. The President has determined to make this a prominent point in his next message, and in answer to our apprehensions as to the probable admission of Michigan into the Union, by a coalition, (the result of a common jealousy) between the Northern and Southern States against Ohio, without a settlement of this question-he declared his fixed determination to apply his veto to any bill, which should make it a State, before the settlement of the boundary difficulty. He is extremely anxious for peaceful and prudent measures. You sir, are the only, the exclusive, and the best judge of the point where you are permitted to stop or compromise at. The Legislature has done its duty-it is with the executive to decide how far he may delay under any, and all circumstances the execution of its mandates. If you should resolve on going the whole, please inform me at Cincinnati; I shall be proud and happy to follow your lead, in whatever it may result; and I entreat you only that if you are to accompany in person, the commissioners, that you will on no account start without me.

I believe in candor, that in this event you will most likely meet with a rude reception. At all events, I am anxious to share with you any perils that may await the enterprise. I have not forgotten that I am a member of the executive family, (military I mean) or what becomes a native of Ohio. I shall write you again in a few days. I shall leave this on Thursday. Please on the receipt direct to Cincinnati.

In haste,
Your friend and humble ser'vt.

ROB’T T. LYTLE. His excellency, ROBERT LUCAS,

Governor of Ohio.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, OHIO,

Columbus, 24th March, 1835. DEAR SIR: Your letter from Washington of the 14th inst. was received last evening. I also received one from Mr. Hamer of the same date, and one from Mr. Forsyth, Secretary of State, U. S. I answered Mr. For: syth's letter at length, and gave him a concise view of the course that had been pursued by the constituted authorities of Ohio on the boundary question; and gave him to understand the course we intended to pursue. I informed him that we had no controversy with Michigan-that our jurisdiction would be extended to the extent of our constitutional limits-and that for any resistance to our laws the civil authorities would be brought to bear upon the offender; but that if resistance should be made to our civil authority, whatever might be the consequences, our civil authority would be sustained. I intormed him that Ohio had taken her stand that she claimed nothing but what was clearly her

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